Longhand Fiction Contest is as Longhand Fiction Contest Does

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Here is my submission on the Long Hand Fiction Contest published by Oliver grey.  The rules state that the piece must be accompanied by proof of Longhand involvement. Although I am reluctant to share my long hand sloppiness I have enclosed a photo of my notebook as well as the story titled: The Writer  Thanks, Oliver, for the motivation to try something a little different.

The Writer by John W. Howell © 2013

I can’t imagine how her picture made its way to the post office. The last time I saw her she was waving goodbye to me and the kids. We were all going camping, but she decided to stay home to get some writing done. She had been trying to finish a story for over two weeks and was constantly interrupted as she worked. Her temperament was becoming increasingly fragile and I knew if the story got finished she would return to normal.

It was okay with us since; we all knew she would rather write her stores than do anything. Besides, she didn’t like to stay in a place that didn’t have room service.

The trip was great and we all returned home to find a note on the TV.

 Family, the note started. I find it difficult to be creative when other duties call me away so often. Please understand that I love you all but need to ride the wave. It was signed, Your Loving Mother -Writer.

Her stories were always of the underworld and the triumph of good over evil. She was working on a story about a female bank robber who was persuaded to give up robbing banks to become a writer. The story was going to be one of great drama and lasting morality. I remember She had done some research on bank robbers and specifically female bank robbers.

It has been three years now since we have heard from her and I now see she decided to give up her craft for a new occupation. I read the post office poster closely and see that her picture looks a little blurry with the words “Wanted by the FBI for Bank Robbery,” underneath.

We will miss her.

17 comments

  1. I really liked the casual tone of the piece. Something about that gives the piece more life and humor.

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    1. Thank you Charles. I am at the point in Beginning of a Hero (not far) where the messenger is floating down the river in pieces and Stiletto can’t wake Luke. I did not expect that. Well done.

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      1. Great. That was a last minute addition.

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  2. Goodness, I don’t think I even remember how to write longhand anymore. The last time I used it was in primary school. Love the story, though. Didn’t see that reversal coming.

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    1. I did this for a writing group exercise and it just fit the rules of the contest. thanks for the comment and liking the story

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  3. Reminds me of a guy I met in Ohio – Claude, of all things – who robbed close to twenty banks using nothing but notes. The perfect MO for a writer/bank robber. I would think loose editing and wordiness would ruin a writer/bank robber. Since cursory writing isn’t taught with any effectiveness now, maybe some sort of bank robber’s app would be useful. Loved the story. Still write all my ideas out on paper, which is one reason I’ve willed my remains to a museum in Missouri.
    Later….

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    1. Hopefully they will accept the dusty box full of notes. 🙂 Thanks for the visit

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  4. Oh my. I fear that will be me.

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    1. As long as you keep writing you can be anything you want.

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  5. Loved it, John. I agree Charles on the casualness really adding to it. I also enjoyed reading your handwritten piece and seeing where you changed and added things.

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    1. This was originally a piece for a writing group and we had no more than ten minutes to construct and write. I left out a couple of things that I was able to edit in. Thanks for the observation and visit. Always a pleasure.

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  6. Like you, I still use longhand. If I used the laptop I would get nothing done because of all the other distractions online. With picture books there is a lot of eraser use and I’m afraid of the flasing cursor.

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  7. […] The Grownup – by Phillip McCollum The Wonderful Cost of Climbing – by Exist for Zen The Writer – by John W. Howell Dmitri – by […]

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  8. This is a wonderful piece, John! A relaxed air about it that invites the reader in for a long sip 🙂

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    1. Thank you so much

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  9. Haha! Great twist. That’s a perfect piece of flash fiction right there.

    And that is some impressive cursive. Not sloppy at all! Sometimes I want to buy a fountain pen and go long hand.

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    1. Yeah, I have a beautiful pen but when I use it leaks. What you saw in the picture was a ball point. This was a writer group exercise and we were given ten minutes so some of the misspellings and sloppy is from the rush to finish. Thank you for the visit and comment

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