Voyage of the Lanternfish – A Visit by Craig Boyack

 

Voyage of the Lanternfish

Normally today would be a Top Ten Things Not to Do post. Because of the launch of his new book, I decided to invite Craig Boyack to the post to tell you all about it. I have read a number of Craig’s books and loved them all. I have not read Voyage of the Lanternfish but have a belief that it will be terrific based on the others. The top Ten will return next week. The post is all yours Craig.

Thanks for inviting me over, John. I’m here to talk about my new book, Voyage of the Lanternfish. This one is a pirate fantasy and includes magic and monsters.

Lanternfish had one of those magical things happen as I was drafting it. An unexpected theme revealed itself, but not intentionally. Drafting a story is my favorite part because sometimes, things you didn’t plot out influence the story in a small way.

Fatherhood is not intended to be a huge, beating drum in this tale. It’s more of a subtle undertone.

James is my main character. His father was a covert operative, who helped start a war among multiple kingdoms. During the war, he fled in the middle of the night to get his son away from all this.

The lessons were available, but sons rarely put stock in the stories told by parents. Now James is forced into a position much like his father’s, but without the knowledge his old man had.

Dan is another major character, but his father is still alive. If James and Dan succeed at starting this new war, his father will be living on one of the future battlefields.

Mule is a secondary character who shows up later in the book. He leaves his parents, who were quite remarkable. They had much to offer a boy, but he didn’t pay as much attention as he could have. This gives James a chance to become a surrogate father.

Mal is an older character and occasionally gives some fatherly advice. It’s small, but it’s there.

There is a collective knowledge base, one generation away, that could help the pirates immensely, had they paid more attention. Now they have to forge their own way, which is only correct for a story.

I included a bit of dialog about fathers, and missing knowledge, but didn’t go over the top with it. They don’t have much time to lament their formative years and have to get on with the bloody business at hand.

James’ father worked on the land, but he used his small fortune to get James a respectable job in the merchant fleet. James tries to do what his father did for a while, then decides his value is at sea. After all, wars happen at sea too, and perhaps they can start one this way.

I know a good many people who read this will be authors themselves. Have you ever had a sub-plot spring to life during the drafting of your tale? I’d love to hear about it.

***

Blurb:

An honorable man is mistaken for his disreputable father. Now he’s pushed into a political scheme to start a war that will spread across multiple kingdoms. James Cuttler’s fiancé is being held captive to ensure he goes through with the plan.

He soon decides his skills are at sea and procures a ship to wage war upon those who disrupted his simple life. He can’t do it alone, so he recruits a band of cutthroats to help him. But first, they need guns and munitions to outfit the ship properly. Deception and trickery will only get them so far. Eventually, they’re going to have to engage the enemy.

James’ goals aren’t necessarily the same as his crew. It’s a delicate balancing act to collect enough loot to keep his crew happy while guiding them back to rescue the girl.

Voyage of the Lanternfish is filled with adventure, magic, and monsters. Lots of monsters. Hoist the colors and come along for the ride.

Purchase Link: http://a-fwd.com/asin-com=B07MP8V633

 

Craig Boyack

Bio:

I was born in a town called Elko, Nevada. I like to tell everyone I was born in a small town in the 1940s. I’m not quite that old, but Elko has always been a little behind the times. This gives me a unique perspective of earlier times, and other ways of getting by. Some of this bleeds through into my fiction.

I moved to Idaho right after the turn of the century and never looked back. My writing career was born here, with access to other writers and critique groups I jumped in with both feet.

I like to write about things that have something unusual. My works are in the realm of science fiction, paranormal, and fantasy. The goal is to entertain you for a few hours. I hope you enjoy the ride.

Craig

75 comments

  1. D.L Finn, Author · ·

    The Lanternfish already sits at the high on my reading list:) I look forward to it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Means a lot to me. Thank you.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Denise.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on Author Don Massenzio and commented:
    Check out this post promoting C.S. Boyack’s new book, Voyage of the Lanternfish, as featured in this post from John Howell’s blog.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks again, Don.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Don.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the help.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Anita and Jaye.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord Blog Magazine and commented:
    John Howell hosts Craig Boyack and his latest book Voyage of the Lanternfish..#Pirates Ahoy

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Appreciate the reblog, Sally.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you for the reblog, Sally

      Liked by 1 person

  4. harmonykent · ·

    So looking forward to reading Lanternfish, Craig. Best of luck! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Harmony.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you for the good wishes, Harmony.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Gwen Plano · ·

    Congratulations, Craig. I’m fascinated by the glimpse and look forward to reading Lanternfish. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Gwen.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Thank you, Gwen.

      Like

  6. Thank you for the introduction, John. This book sounds most interesting…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Dale.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. I agree, Dale. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Congratulations, Craig! Thanks for the peek into Lanternfish, John. Happy Monday, guys!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Jill.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Jill. Happy Monday to you.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. This sounds like a fascinating story. I love the concept of: “There is a collective knowledge base, one generation away” as that is so often the case in business and in the world. We keep facing and solving the same problems.

    Good luck with this book.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It just kind of happened while I was drafting the tale. It’s true though.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thanks for the good wishes, Dan

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I love it when pleasant surprises happen as we write, but I’m going to have to think about whether a full-on secondary theme has ever emerged as I wrote. Great post, Craig.

    John, many thanks for hosting.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Staci. Things like this happen to me all the time. Maybe that’s why I love drafting new material so much.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thank you for the visit and comment, Staci

        Liked by 2 people

    2. My pleasure, Staci

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for letting me anchor here today, John. You get an extra rum ration.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Arggggg matey. Good on ya.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Reblogged this on Entertaining Stories and commented:
    Lanternfish is docked at Port Aransas today. Stop over to John’s place and say hi. The topic is those unexpected things that happen when we write our stories. John is a great author and blogger. If you haven’t met him yet, you need to get over there double quick.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for the intro, Craig.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. John, you’re such a good friend for doing this. Craig, best of luck with the new book. While it’s not my typical genre, it does sound intriguing!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Debbie. Intrigue is the first step…

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Debbie. I think you would enjoy the book since Craig’s boks are so much fun.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I’m not sure a secondary or sub-plot has ever surfaced while writing. My writing has been mostly short stories and there is really no room for anything more than the story itself.

    I do know what my grandparents told us many stories as we grew up. I cherish those, and know that most of our younger generation don’t truly listen and regret it later.

    I enjoyed the book very much. Best of luck.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I was more inclined to pay attention to my grandparents too. Modern society is losing its ability to communicate. Too much electronic distraction.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Michelle. I loved my grandparent’s stories as well.

      Like

  14. I am looking forward to reading Lanternfish, Craig. I am sure it will not disappoint, as your books are always filled with moving plots and quirky, fun characters. Congratulations on completing another work of art. Thanks to John for hosting today. And cheers to you both.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Jet. I think it will register on the quirky meter.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you so much, Jet.

      Like

  15. “Laternfish” sounds interesting, Crag! Congratulations! Lots of Smooth ‘selling’! ♥

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Bily Ray.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Thanks, Billy Ray. I’ll take all the well wishes I can get.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Sorry about the missing ‘Aye’, Cap’n! ♥

    Liked by 3 people

  17. Oh yes, I’ve had a sub-plot spring up when writing. In fact, it went on to become my longest short story to date. People even say to me – “You’ll always be known for that short story.”

    Thanks for the introduction to Lanternfish. The cover for the book is wonderful. I wish you much success with it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Hugh. Thanks for sharing your experience too.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Thanks, Hugh. It’s neat when it happens. I didn’t plan it, but it is a small force behind the crew.

      Liked by 2 people

  18. I had a HUGE sub-plot develop in End of Day as I was drafting it. It involved the MC’s sister, Madison, and a trio of brothers. Part of that sub-plot hangs around in the final book, Eventide, which I’m drafting now. It’s amazing how those things spring up and develop a life of their own.

    I’m at the 50% mark in Lanternfish right now. I was SO TICKED I had to stop reading to go sleep last night, LOL. You’ve really exceeded yourself with this one. I can’t tell you how much I’m enjoying it. And what a crew of characters! I hope you revisit this world again, because I’m enthralled.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. There is a certain magic that happens when drafting a story. I can’t explain it any other way. Really excited that you’re enjoying Lanternfish. Can’t wait to see what your overall view is.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thanks for sharing anf the visit, Mae.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. It is somewhat surprising when a subplot takes over the story. I think it adds dimension as long as it enhances the main plot. I thoroughly enjoyed the different father aspects of the Lanternfish. Thanks for hosting, John!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Jan. It was interesting that it kept creeping into the story.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you for the visit and your comments, Jan

      Like

  20. “Pirate fantasy” – different! Nice to hear an author describe his own work.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Jo. It is nice.

      Like

  21. This sounds amazing, Craig.
    Good luck.

    Great share, John.
    Your generosity is limitless and does you great credit.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much. John is very generous and supportive of the author community.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure, Craig.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Thank you , Hook. You da man.

      Like

  22. I have really enjoyed getting to know Craig’s new characters through these posts, John. A jolly good idea. I have this book on my list.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for the comment and viisit, Robbie. It’s on my list too.

      Like

    2. Thanks, Robbie. Glad you’re enjoying the tour.

      Liked by 1 person

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