Welcome to the WATCH “RWISA” WRITE Showcase Tour! #RRBC #RWISA with Gwen M. Plano @gmplano

Watch RWISA Write

As a member of Rave Reviews Book Club, I am proud to showcase several exceptional writers. All are members of the literary section of the club titled Rave Writers – International Society of Authors. RWISA.

Today I want to welcome Gwen M. Plano with her story The Rosery.

THE ROSARY by Gwen M. Plano

Young or old, we are all children at heart. This truth became apparent to me last December when I had neurosurgery.

Prior to the operation, a clerk handed me a stack of documents to sign—billing forms for the hospital and the doctors and several medical release forms that included a list of potential risks. My apprehension grew as I fingered through the papers and provided my signature. It was then that I wished that my mom could be with me. Like any child, I thought she could make it all better. But sadly, she had passed away nine months prior.

My mom was a person of prayer, and when I was young, she’d gather her seven children, tell us to get on our knees, and then proceed to pray. We’d follow her lead—usually protesting—and pray for family members, friends, and the unknown masses. Often, she led us in saying the rosary. Prayer was my mom’s response to any challenge or difficulty, and we had plenty of both on our farm.

Mom’s most common expression was, “Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!” While some of us might curse or yell in frustration, Mom would say this phrase instead.  So, when one of my brothers sent a golf ball through the picture window, Mom called out “Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!” before scolding him. When we siblings squabbled with one another, Mom would mutter, “Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!” before sending us to our bedrooms. Without exception, we grew up knowing that when Mom said “Jesus, Mary, and Joseph,” we were in trouble.

I can’t remember a time when Mom wasn’t praying. Whether washing the dishes, hanging the wash on the clothesline, working in the garden, or driving us to a sporting event or a 4-H meeting, Mom quietly prayed. I asked her about this once, and her response left an indelible impression.

“Life is short,” she began, “and we must use every moment to the fullest. People need our prayers, and some don’t have a family to pray for them like we do.”

I didn’t understand her comment about using every moment to the fullest until I grew older. But her explanation helped me grasp why she rarely watched television and why she rushed from one room to another throughout the day.

When Mom passed at ninety-two years of age, she left a legacy of beliefs and practices that had found a place in the heart of each of her children. We may have complained about kneeling on the hard floor, but even as little tykes, prayer became part of our lives because of our mother.

At her passing, we were bereft. Mom was our strength, our compass. She was the one we called about concerns, both large and small; she was the one we talked with about our hopes and dreams. Her passing left a huge emptiness that still echoes in our memories. When we sorted through her belongings, not so surprisingly, we discovered she had a dozen or so rosaries. I received two of them.

When I checked into Cedars Sinai hospital in Los Angeles, I took my mom’s wooden rosary with me. I felt her near when I held it, and this sensation gave me comfort.  I held the beads tightly and imagined Mom with me.

After the surgery, I was rolled into a room on the Pain Floor where all neurosurgery patients were housed. Next to me was an adjustable overbed table, and when I awakened, I realized that my mom’s rosary rested on it.

My nurse, Lucy, regularly came in to check on me, and each time she walked through the door, she sang a refrain which included the words, our lady of the rosary. I was surprised by this, because Cedars Sinai is a Jewish hospital. After Lucy left, an aide visited, and she explained that her sister was a nun, and my rosary reminded her of this sister. Later, the night nurse came in and told me about immigrating to the US and how she loved the rosary.

During my hospital stay, one staff person after another visited me and shared family stories and photos—all evoked by the rosary that rested on the overbed table. As I was preparing to leave, Lucy came in to say her goodbyes. She pulled a photo from her pocket.

“This is my mom,” she proudly stated. “I thought you’d like to see her.”

The image was of a petite woman, hunched over by time, smiling broadly at the camera. She stood next to her much-larger daughter, Lucy. I was stunned; she looked like my mom.

As the hospital staff came to say goodbye and wish me well, I suddenly realized that Mom had been with me the whole while. I had been loved and cared for by many at the hospital, but it was Mom who drew them near with her rosary.

∼∼∼

Thank you for supporting this member along the WATCH “RWISA” WRITE Showcase Tour today!  We ask that if you have enjoyed this member’s writing, please visit their Author Page on the RWISA site, where you can find more of their writing, along with their contact and social media links, if they’ve turned you into a fan.

We ask that you also check out their books in the RWISA or RRBC catalogs.  Thanks, again for your support and we hope that you will follow each member along this amazing tour of talent!  Don’t forget to click the link below to learn more about this author:

Gwen Plano RWISA Author Page

53 comments

  1. What a beautiful tribute to your mother, Gwen. Thanks for sharing, John!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you so much, Jill. She was a beautiful woman. ♥

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Just like her daughter. ❤

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Super comment, Jill.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Thanks for the comment, Jill.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Touching story, glad the operation went well. Thank you for hosting, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you, Mark, for your kind comment. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You are more than welcome.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Thanks for your comment, Mark.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Gwen Plano · · Reply

    Thank you for hosting my story today, John. I’m not sure my mom ever read a thriller, but I know she would love yours if she had. 🙂 All the best to you!

    Like

    1. All the best to you as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Gwen is indeed a gifted scribe, John.
    Thanks for spotlighting her work.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for the comment and visit, Hook.

      Like

    2. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you for your kind comment. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wonderful story, Gwen.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Craig.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you, Craig. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  6. A gifted lady with a beautiful heart who writes with love and wisdom. Thanks, John, for hosting! ♥♥

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you so much, Billy Ray. ♥

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Billy Ray.

      Like

  7. You’re welcome… ♥

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Beautiful story, Gwen. Thank you for hosting, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. My pleasure, Linda.

      Like

    2. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you so much, Linda. ♥

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Oh my gosh, I have goosebumps and am a bit weepy. What a beautiful tribute to your Mom, Gwen!

    Thank you for sharing this lovely story, John!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Deborah

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you so much, Deborah. Since this experience, I never doubt my mom’s nearness. ♥

      Liked by 2 people

  10. D.L. Finn, Author · · Reply

    So beautiful, Gwen. Love knows no boundaries. Thanks for hosting, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. My pleasure, Denise.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      You are so right, Denise. Love transcends time and space. As you said, it knows no boundaries. How extraordinary. Thank you so much! ♥

      Liked by 2 people

  11. A beautiful story from Gwen. Hearing true moments like this always warms my heart.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Me too, Mae. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Gwen Plano · · Reply

      Thank you, Mae. I so appreciate your thoughtfulness. ♥

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

      Thank you so much, Traci. I so appreciate it. ♥

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You’re welcome, Gwen! Good luck!

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you, Traci.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome, John!

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Such a beautiful post, Gwen. Thank you for hosting, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for the nice word, Rhani.

      Like

    2. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

      Thank you very much, Rhani. Blessings….

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

    Thank you very much, Rhani. Blessings….

    Liked by 2 people

  14. What a beautiful story to share with us, Gwen, via John (thank you!)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Dale.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for sharing! What a great story.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

      Thank you, Dale. I so appreciate your comment.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. It was truly a wonderful read, Gwen.

        Liked by 2 people

  15. A marvelous story from Gwen. I’m so glad you shared it here, John. Hugs to you both.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Teagan. I’m glad you came by.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

      Thank you so much, Teagan. ♥

      Liked by 2 people

  16. outshineovariancancer · · Reply

    Gwen, your story touched me deeply. Thank you for hosting, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for the visit, Karen

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

      Thank you, dear Karen. Blessings… ♥

      Liked by 2 people

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