Views of the Neighborhood – More Plants

Since not much is going on around the neighborhood, The Producer and I went out searching for signs of spring. Come walk with us.

As we get started we should read the famous signboard in front of El Arroyo restaurant in Austin. Pretty much describes Texas weather.

Yeah, this morning, lots of fog. Sure sign of spring

Views of the neighborhood

Last week we saw a couple of puny artichoke agaves. Here is the grandmother of all artichoke agaves. It is about eight feet across and I guess it to be over thirty years old. Not spring but thought you would like to see a big one.

Views of the neighborhood

Here is a bush that is beginning to bloom. The Producer and I cannot identify it. It is not a Forsythia. Any ideas? It is very prolific and looks like its branches grow up and then cascade down the plant.

Views of the Neighborhood

Here are some red berries of a Hawthorn. Not sure if it is a green bark Hawthorn or not. It looks like it started as a shrub and then trimmed to look like a tree.

Huge agave. Not a sign

A sign of spring is trimmed Crepe Myrtles. They flower from new growth so they need to be trimmed each year. These have been trimmed to within an inch of their lives. There is some debate about whether trimming them this radically produces the best results. Some people call this kind of trimming Crepe Murder. A swing by in a few weeks will tell the tale.

Views of the Neighborhood

Here is a Crepe Myrtle that has not been trimmed as yet.

Views of the Neighborhood

A yucca in bloom. Not necessarily a sign of spring since they can bloom anytime.

Heavenly Bamboo showing its berries

Deer out and about without worrying about those nasty bucks chasing them. Yup. A sign of spring.

Views of the Neighborhood.

The ever-popular Rosemary. Blooming blue flowers.

I hope you enjoyed the walk. Here have a margarita. You’ve earned it.

 

83 comments

  1. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

    I loved the morning walk, John. It’s too chilly in our area to enjoy being outside. Happy Sunday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was nice yesterday. In the 60s. Today down to the 50s but sunny.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Great shots. Though I always thought we have a few more months of winter. Finally snowed here yesterday.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes you do. Down here spring is in mid to late February. We were pushing it. πŸ˜€

      Like

  3. I enjoyed the walk and that agave was amazing!
    We have been threatened with snow soon, so Spring might be delayed…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes. Snow does delay spring for sure. Thanks, Anita.

      Like

  4. You have such a lovely neighbourhood. The bush with the yellow flowers looks a bit like a broom plant to me. They are everywhere here in Spain and we had them in Vancouver as well. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/broom-plants/information-on-broom-shrubs.htm

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Darlene. The flowers on this one are single blooms not a chain. The Broom plant flowers are chains. Thanf you though. You wouldn’t have been able to tell by my photo. πŸ˜€

      Like

  5. Nice early signs of spring, John. I fear we’ll have to wait a few months for that here, though.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We might be pushing it. Our spring is usualy mid to late February.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. If you are showing the signs of spring now, that means it will work it’s way northward – but slowly. I didn’t realize Crepe Myrtles got that big!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Some are huge. Waiting for spring is like watching for the water to boil.

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  7. I think your weather is similar to ours, John. I had no idea Hawthorns got that big. We have several in our yard, but they are smaller. Great walk, John! Enjoy your Sunday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s why I think it is a bush that has been trimmed. There are Hawthorn trees but they usual have one trunk. Thanks, Jill

      Liked by 1 person

  8. A beautiful walk, John. I might know someone who can identify that bush – she just recently moved from Texas.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Would like to know. Thanks, GP.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I see on your site that Linda (Shoreacres) did her usual excellent job of identification.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. She is a wonder for sure. Yes she got it.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Some lovely lawns, John. Good pictures. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thak you, Suzanne. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  10. What a wonderful collection of plants. I’m almost certain your yellow flowers belong to a shrub/vine called winter jasmine: Jasminum nudiflorum There’s an almost identical bush growing at the corner of TX16 and Spicer Loop in Kerrville, and another one along the river in a Kerrville Park. It’s a January bloomer that’s described as a trailing, viny shrub growing from a central crown. As a shrub, it typically grows to about 4-5′ tall with arching branches, and spreads by trailing branches that root as they go along the ground. Compare the flowers with online photos and see if they’re a match. There clearly are some arching branches at the top of this one.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. We will try to confirm with a photo of the flower. For now though, thaks you , Linda. I know you would have an idea. 😁

      Like

    2. Confirmed. We ran the flower through the recognition program and came up with the Jasminum nudiforum diagnosis. Thanks again, Linda.

      Like

  11. The sign is hilarious. The other pictures I like as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Rabirius. 😊

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  12. How does a gardener move a great big agave ? Usually not with a great big shovel – and very carefully. The easiest way to move a succulent is to take a cutting and NOT plant it right away. Now on a great big agave you might be able to get away with a smaller part of one of those 4 foot long leaves. The tips of the leaves can be pointy. Once the portion of the leaf is cut off let it air dry for a few days until it heals over. Then put the cut end against some soil, Then just wait. There might even be time for several and several more trips around the neighborhood.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good tips, John. I had so many Agaves at the coast. I’m not sure I want any. (Several blood transfusions from the plant sticks) The way I removed them when they got oversized there was to wrap a chain around them and the other end to my Fj40. Put 4 wheel in low-low and drive away. If I want them here I will follow your tips.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Good morning, John,
    Your post reminds me that I really need to get out and trim our Crepe Myrtles – and a lot of other trees.
    Have a great Sunday,
    Pit

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is that time of the year. Thanks, Pit.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Great photos, John. You are a couple months ahead of us on the march toward spring. Thanks for sharing your color. Our world is white and grey today. Snow and fog.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Maybe we were rushing it some.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. OGM! All the deer in that yard! Crystal would be ecstatic. She loves to watch videos of deer.
    That second agave cracked me up. It made me think of Little Shop of Horrors. Hugs to you and the gang — and Seymore.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Teagan. Who is Seymore?

      Like

      1. I spelled it wrong… should be Seymour. The play/movie with the monster plant, Little Shop of Horrors. Seymour is the shop clerk. I keep thinking that’s the name of the plant… My bad on several levels. https://youtu.be/RVsz2yLBf-Y?t=3

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Ha hahaha. Thanks. Got it.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Those agave plants are HUGE! And I had to do a double take when I saw all the deer in that front yard. That’s a great capture, since you just do not see that every day.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We see it here. These guys are everywhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That is wild!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yes it is. At times a little annoying too.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. You’re spoiled, John. πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Now, I’ve had time to come back and look at the rest of the photos. That sign is hilarious, and the yuccas are impressive. You might want to take another look at the hawthorn. I saw it as a beautifully manicured possumhaw, because of the arrangement of the berries along the branches. Hawthorn forms its fruit in clusters. Here are some photos of possumhaw (Ilex decidua) in fall that might help.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are no doubt right. I couldn’t find anything but a Hawthorn and this one was suspect cause it did not have a single trunk.

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  18. Deer & plants! What a nice botanical garden, dear John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is nice Maria. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Great walk! Good to see signs of spring in Austin. It has been a mild January for us so far. The morning fog has been the best sign of spring here. Lovely neighborhood. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jo. I would suspect you guys woud have a pretty nice month.

      Like

  20. These are wonderful, John — thank you for a look at early Spring. Of course, ’tis still winter here (but thankfully, no snow on the ground!) and quite cold. Nothing much spring-like about that. Loved the deer and all those plants!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Debbie. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  21. The agave are cool! Are those white-tail deer, John? They look healthy πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes they are and yes they are healthy. Thanks, Jacquie.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Very pretty. Thank you for the walk! And that sign! LOL!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Glad you liked it. Thanks, luanne.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Listen up, Buttercup. January and Spring do NOT belong in the same sentence! That is just being mean to us folk north of the 35th meridian North…
    Now, that said, the size of that agave is HUUUUGE!!! I bet having all those deer around is a problem for gardens…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The deer require specific plantings. No flowers at all. They are a problem in that regard.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ve no doubt ..

        Liked by 1 person

  24. I see what you did there. Stuck that blue agave into your last line. Did you find any antlers dropped in your yard?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We haven’t found any but they have to be somewhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. They’re all in that tequila bottle.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Maybe that’s true.

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Thanks for the tour of the neighborhood!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for coming along, Mark. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Look at all the deer! I’ve never seen so many together before – especially in a yard. Because of 70 degree weather, we started having signs of spring, but this morning it’s 16 degrees. Whatever was starting to bloom is probably dead now.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good grief. Your weather sounds like Texas.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. That giant artichoke agave is beautiful. And “crepe murder?” Ha ha ha. Thanks for the lovely spring tour. πŸ™‚

    Like

  28. A lovely walk around the neighborhood viewing the local plants. We haven’t had our winter weather yet, so I’m wondering if our spring flowers will be out early.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope they don’t get surprised if they do come out. Thanks, Michelle.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. That Hawthorne is gorgeous against that stone building/house. I loved all the deer. I’m glad someone ID’d the yellow flowering bush for you I had no idea.

    No signs of spring here yet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Deborah.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Your β€˜S’ word in January is spring, and our β€˜S’ word in January is snow?? Really? πŸ™‚ I love the plants, but I’m a little worried about the crepe myrtle. Please keep us posted, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I will be interesting to see how it works out with the crepe myrtles.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Me, too. A little nail biting here…

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Watch those cuticles.

        Liked by 1 person

  31. I have missed so many posts … I don’t know where to start. but I’ll take a day-two to go thru the latest. Finally, getting back after one month vacation πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ ah, how’s life? neighbourhood looks absolutely lovely… its crazy but here is also GREEN, very warm winter. Flowers are on the way, and its only February in Sweden πŸ™€πŸ€¨

    Like

    1. Global warming is now getting to Sweden. Nice to see you back. Don’t try to catch up. Too much work. Happy Weekend, VR. πŸ•Ί

      Liked by 1 person

      1. True about warming…feels like spring here πŸ™ƒ no problems, I’ll try to go around and read what happened last month πŸ•ΊπŸ•ΊπŸ•Ί

        Liked by 1 person

      2. 😊 You were missed.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. 😜✌️🍫🍫

        Like

  32. love the pics. Please keep on bloggin.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Sharon. I will.

      Like

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