Yellow Hair by Andrew Joyce – A Review

 

Front cover of Yellow Hair

I don’t usually post reviews on this blog for no other reason than I have a format for each day and a desire to keep my posts to a minimum number each week. Today I’m making an exception since I believe the reader would benefit from knowing about Yellow Hair by Andrew Joyce. What benefit, you may ask? The benefit of reading about the Native North American’s real story and how they were taken advantage of by the white settlers.

Here is a blurb of the book from Amazon.

Through no fault of his own, a young man is thrust into a new culture just as that culture is undergoing massive changes. It is losing its identity, its lands, and its dignity. He not only adapts, he perseveres and, over time, becomes a leader—and on occasion, the hand of vengeance against those who would destroy his adopted people.

In this compelling, richly researched novel, author Andrew Joyce tells a story of epic endurance against all odds. From the first page to the last, fans of Dee Brown and W. Michael Gear will enjoy this riveting, historically accurate tale of adventure, family, love, and hate that spans most of the 19th century. This is American history.

Awarded Book of the Year by Just Reviews.
Awarded Best Historical Fiction of 2016 by Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Here’s what I thought.

I have read two other books by Andrew Joyce and always thought that the amount of research that goes into his stories is staggering. Yellow Hair is no exception. From the first chapter, the author spent a great deal of time researching the subject matter. It is also clear the author has exceptional writing skills since the story itself is well crafted, exciting, and hard to put down.

It is the story of the Dakota tribe of indigenous people and their struggles to maintain their customs and lifestyle as the white settlers encroached and destroyed their territory. The author uses a white settler who is a lone survivor of a wagon train as the focal point as the story unfolds. A female member of the Dakotas rescues the young immigrant. She nurses him back to health, and he eventually earns brave status within the tribe. His name is Yellow Hair for the apparent fact that he is a blond-headed white man.

The balance of the book follows Yellow Hair through the actual historical events of that time. The US was engaged in a Civil War. The affairs of native Americans were pretty much an afterthought to the significant concerns of the war. Only after the murder of several settlers did the government turn its attention to trying to solve the “Indian Problem” through annihilation.

The author takes us on a long journey of injustice and struggle. We witness how the agents cheated the Native Americans out of their land. We see how the government set up systems never to pay the native Americans monies owed. We suffer through the hunger and lack of dignity fostered upon the Dakotas by those out to grab more land. The telling of the story is with great skill by Mr. Joyce. The book tells the historical account as if it is happening right now. The reader is immersed in the detail and can feel the emotions of the characters. At times the action is so tense it is tough to set the book aside until the scene’s resolution.

I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read more about the injustices perpetrated upon Native Americans while enjoying an action-packed story that will have the reader on the edge of their seat.

I give this book five stars.

Bio.

Andrew Joyce left home at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written seven books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded the Editors’ Choice Award for Best Western of 2013. A subsequent novel, Yellow Hair, received the Book of the Year award from Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 from Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Joyce now lives in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

You can find his books on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Joyce/e/B00EUCFDTM

76 comments

  1. […] Yellow Hair by Andrew Joyce – A Review […]

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Charles.

      Like

    2. Thanks, Charles, for spreading the word.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent review. Thanks for sharing, John. I will definitely be checking out Andrew’s books 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They are good. Thanks, Harmony.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I appreciate the thought, Harmony.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Chris. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Thank you for the reblog, Chris.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Nice to have Andrew (Howard Hughes) Joyce comment. 😁

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I saw this book featured on Sally’s blog. I was intrigued and after reading your review even more so. Going to look into this one.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Joan. It gives you a good background of the Native American struggle that still goes on.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ve got to read this one!

        Liked by 1 person

    2. If you read it, Joan, I hope you enjoy it.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I’m sure I will, Andrew. I’m interested in stories about Native Americans.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. What a terrific review of a book I loved. Thanks so much for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Barb. I loved it too. I also enjoyed Mahoney.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Ah, one of my favorite people chimed in.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. The book does sound good!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is, Liz. The book is one that you can’t wait to get back to continue reading.

      Like

    2. Thanks, Liz, for reading the review.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You’re welcome, Andrew.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

    Great review, John. I’m interested for sure! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Gwen. 😊

      Like

  7. Fantastic review, John. Thanks for the introduction!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Jill

      Like

  8. Fab review, John – thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for reading, Teri

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I agree completely, John. It was incredibly rich but also hard to read at points.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well there is that.

      Like

    2. Hi, Noelle. Longtime, no see.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ve been really busy working on my fifth mystery and trying to find a suitable main character for my next historical novel, not to mention taking care of my 15-month-old grandson, who is a delight. He makes me feel young! Where is your boat/home anchored now? And do you think you will get another dog? I do love your books and need to get down to writing you some reviews. Count me lazy.

        Liked by 2 people

  10. That’s the second time I’ve seen this one recently. The fact that you recommend it means I might have to try it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The review was so good, if I didn’t know how the book ended, I’d buy it.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Best response I’ve ever heard on a blog tour.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I agree, Craig

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Thanks, John. Kind words indeed. I’m honored that you took the time to read it and then give a review. I don’t usually reblog stuff (hell, I seldom blog, never mind reblog), but I might make an exception in this case.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Nah. Thanks is enough.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. D.L. Finn, Author · · Reply

    Wonderful review, John. I have this on my TBR list and can see I need to move it up.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Denise. I think you will like it.

      Like

    2. I’m honored that it’s on your TBR list, D.L.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. This book has been on my KIndle for a while now. I really must read it as it sounds amazing. I enjoy Andrew’s writing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I do too, Darlene. Yes you must move it up. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Thanks, Darlene, for buying my book. Hope you enjoy it.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. You have definitely piqued my interest, John. I have a fairly sizable collection of books dedicated to Native American history during the 1800s, and am always looking to add to my titles. Thank you for this wonderful review. I will be looking into Yellow Hair.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I think if you enjoy history this is one for you. Also very exciting.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Some reviewers have said it’s more of a textbook than a novel. I think it’s 50/50.

      Liked by 2 people

  15. petespringerauthor · · Reply

    I know this one is coming up fairly soon in my rotation. After reading Mahoney, I was hooked.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I read them in the same order, Pete. This book you will enjoy.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. This one is on my Kindle and I look forward to reading it. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on it, John!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for the comment, Jan. You will like the story.

      Like

    2. Hey, Jan. Thanks for buying the book.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Thanks for reviewing Yellow Hair, John. We all need to know the real story of Native Americans.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes we do. It’s a super book.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Book Club Mom: Some people say the story is too real. I don’t know. But I can tell you, I was pissed off when I wrote it. I had to edit out 70,000 words of preaching. I had to turn it into a novel and not a rant.

      Liked by 3 people

  18. This sounds A+++++!
    I’m a Canadian, and we stole Canada from it’s original inhabitants, just like you guys did.
    Although born here, a descendant of United Empire Loyalists, I am humiliated by our pioneer history/theft.
    Yes, there are gripping tales of the wild west, but let us not forget who was here first. Let us surrender to doing the right thing from now on!
    UCH! The French settled Canada first. Then the British beat the French and took Canada from them.
    Many of the French want to separate from the rest of Canada.

    So one day the leader of the Separatist Party walks into the office of the Prime Minister, and throws a thick book of how the English stole Canada from the French, onto the desk.
    It makes the news.
    A day or 2 later, one of the First Nations leaders walks into the French separatist’s office and throws an even thicker book about how the French stole Canada from its natives, onto his desk.
    True!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Great story Resa. Thanks for sharing and I agree we need to remember what our forefathers did to Native N. Americans. By the way the Dekota tribe described in Andrews book actually spent time in Canada

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s interesting!

        Liked by 1 person

  19. Wonderful review John and well deserved, Andrew’s book is exceptional.. enjoy the rest of your birthday weekend.. hugs

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thak you, Sally. It has been a super 80th.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. This was an outstanding review, John. I have the book ready for my summer reading.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You will like it, Jennie

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I know I will. I’ve read many of the stories from the book that Andrew posts. Damn he’s a good writer and storyteller!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Yes he is. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Excellent review John! I’m checking this one out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s a good book.

      Liked by 1 person

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