Views of the Neighborhood – Old Lakeway

Old Lakeway is geographically defined by the boundaries of the original 17 sections and first 1,000 acres of Lakeway, developed between October 1962 and April 1971, by Lakeway Land Co. In 2017, street signs, featuring the original Lakeway logo, were added at each intersection in the neighborhood delineating the area.

A neighborhood, tucked into a corner of the City of Lakeway, Texas, with a unique charm and history all its own. Characterized by narrow, winding streets, mature oaks, architecturally diverse homes, many with spectacular views, including Lake Travis, the Hill Country, and Live Oak, Lakeway’s first golf course.

.

Once the home of people like astronaut Alan Shepard Jr., news anchor Dan Rather, and other prominent business people and professionals of the time, early Lakeway became one of the premier resort communities in the U.S. All that is Lakeway today, grew out of Old Lakeway.

OLD Lakeway

The Inn and Spa

Photo of the Pool and Lake Travis view from the spa.

Enterence to the spa

Enterence to the marina.

A quick shot of the marina through the trees.

The first home built in Lakeway in 1964.

The special signs attached to the street signs marking the Old Lakeway boundries.

The Live Oak Golf Club.

The so called Mushroom house built in 1979 and designed by the architect John Watson a Frank Lloyd Wright apprentice

Another view of the mushroom house.

Alan Shepard's house

The astronaut Alan Shepard’s vacation home. He would fly in and land at the Lakeway airpark on weekends to visit his home.

An example of one kind of house in Old Lakeway

Lakeway Patio Home Condominimums built in 1971 and the first in Texas.

Another example of an  Old Lakeway home.

Final example of the diverse archetecture of Old Lakeway.

If you care to read more here is more information about Old Lakeway. Thanks for the company.

LAKEWAY HISTORY*

A brief history of Lakeway……

  • 1937: construction on the dam started, 1941, New Deal project created Lake Travis
  • 1941: three men from Houston visited area looking for a hotel site
  • 1962: rancher Jack Josey showed his 2700 ranch on Lake Travis to same three men
    • They immediately took a 60-day option with plan to develop more than a hotel
  • 1962: (October), construction began on The Inn / partnership expanded to 10 men
  • 1962-1965: partnership bought 3,697 acres from Josey
  • 1963: (July 12) Grand Opening of The Inn and Marina
  • 1963: the airpark completed
  • 1964: first custom home built at 104 Highlander, owners become first permanent residents of Lakeway
  • 1965: (October 1) Live Oak golf coarse opened
  • 1967: (August 5) A major brush fire along Challenger near Hurst Creek prompts development of Lakeway Village Fire Department (est Dec 1968)
  • 1971: Lakeway Patio home condominiums section 1 is completed, becoming the first condominiums built in Texas (Kite St. at Lido)
  • 1971: (April 26) Gulfmont / Lakeway Land Co (Houston) sold its interest in Lakeway to Alpert Corp (Dallas)
    • 300 homes built and 1,000 acres developed at this time

*Source: A. Denys Cadman, and Byron D. Varner, “In the Beginning: A Brief History of Lakeway” Austin: Silverdale, 1981

For a more comprehensive history of Lakeway, visit the City of Lakeway website.

And a little about the Old Lakeway project.

EVOLUTION OF THE OLD LAKEWAY PROJECT

  • Started as an idea in 2015, the Old Lakeway Project was originally focused exclusively on the first 300 homes built in Lakeway, with the goal of recognizing those homes that still honored the original architect’s exterior design vision.
  • From that, was born the secondary project goal of building a neighborhood, and the current project goal was formed: “Preserving Lakeway’s history through its homes, and forming a neighborhood known as “Old Lakeway”.
  • The Old Lakeway neighborhood is defined as the first 17 Sections and 1,000 acres developed by Lakeway Land Company at the time they sold their interests in Lakeway on April 26, 1971.
  • The establishment of the Old Lakeway neighborhood includes more than the owners of the first 300 homes; we estimate 750 to 800 homes are a part of this defined neighborhood, however all of Lakeway will benefit from the preservation of this historically significant area.

The Old Lakeway Project currently has two goals:

  1. Recognize the first 300 homes built in Lakeway with an emphasis on those that retain the original architects’ exterior vision
  2. Build Lakeway’s first real neighborhood, known as “Old Lakeway”

….and have some fun connecting with neighbors in the process!

59 comments

  1. Gwen Plano · ·

    Fascinating, John. Through time and circumstance, you can hobnob with Alan Shepard. How amazing is that! Someday, folks will be pointing to your home as the residence of a famous thriller writer. 🙂 Have a fantastic day.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Ha haha. Thank you for the statement of faith, Gwen. 😁

      Like

  2. Lots of stories behind each door 🚪 🙂 last house/pic is very modern …mushroom? Mmmm I’m not sure I’d go for it 😂😂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not my style either.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I love having a nose round other people’s houses. I would choose the mushroom house – I hope it’s near the spa…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not too far. Maybe a mile or two

      Liked by 1 person

  4. There can be only one Highlander sign, John.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks for taking us on the tour, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, GP.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Quite the variety of home styles … and it seems to be still well maintained! Almost equal distance to Central Market in Austin and Scoop & Score in Cedar Park. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Frank. 😁🍨

      Like

  7. Great shots as usual. Thanks for the history lesson too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Charles

      Like

  8. Interesting background information on this area, John. I enjoyed the pictures of the various homes. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Suzanne.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I enjoyed reading the history, John. Quite an interesting story. I like the mushroom house, and the fact that the original homes were architecturally diverse. Thsnks for the tour.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Dan

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for sharing this with us, John. So much interesting history.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jill.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. The first home built in Lakeway looks as modern as some houses do today. Wouldn’t look out of place on a modern development. I wonder if it still has some of the original fittings inside?
    Thanks for another tour, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Usually the home are upgraded especially in the kitchen. Alan Shepard’s home was completely renovated inside after it was sold.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That puts me in mind of those who renovate before selling, only for the new owners to tear everything out again, John.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. A continuous process, Hugh. Thanks.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. This was interesting, John. The old neighborhood feels rather like a time capsule of the late 60s. It would be cool to see inside the mushroom house. Off to Google! 😀 It’s fun to virtually travel with you as you get acquainted with your new area. Have a beautiful holiday weekend. 🕊️ Hugs on the wing. 🕊️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Teagan. You as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Great location, John. I really like what they did in the “olden days”. 🙂 Not what they (often) do nowadays. lots and lots of houses all looking the same on parcels that have just a few feet of garden space around each house.
    Oh, I’m glad I found, through your post, that one can charter sailing-boats there. I really need to follow up on this.
    Have a wonderful Sunday,
    Pit

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Pit

      Like

  14. The first house looks like it would fit into today’s modern architecture. How neat that architect had a timeless theme.

    The Mushroom house! That’s one I’d like to see inside of and see how they decorated it.

    Thanks for the tour, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I would like to go inside too, Deborah. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. And now you’ve added your prestigious mark on Lakeway! Thanks for the cool shots. What side of Lake Travis are you on? Back in the early seventies, when I lived in Austin, we would go out to Lake Travis to cool off, but I’m sure we didn’t go into neighborhoods like this one. Great shots and thanks for sharing the history!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. We are Northwest of Austin. The lake does a couple of meanders. I think we are on the South side.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Perfect leisure place, dear John! And so much interesting is all around!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Maria.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. You are a five star tour guide.

    Love the stone architecture. The mushroom house . . not so much.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha haha. I feel the same way.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Your tours are always so much fun, AND I end up learning something.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Aw, such a nice thing to say. Thanks, Marc.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. As soon as you mentioned Lake Travis, I knew where you relocated to, John. What a beautiful area of Texas — and I’ll bet you’re especially pleased this weekend, seeing as how you don’t have all those pesky visitors, ha! Thanks for the tour — love the look of the white house on Old Lakeway!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Debbie. Yup that is where we are.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. do you preserve interesting/old buildings with the relish we do with out Listed Building rules here? these are just the sort that would be on someone’s radar to preserve as examples of a particular layout, style, time etc. And I wonder if they made a bundle for those first three/ten partners?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Buildings on the national register yes. Here in Lakeway there are rules but none that say a building must be preserved. They are trying to honor those that have been though.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. It looks very relaxing!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I really enjoy the way you weave the narrative and the images, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Rob

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Lots of diversity. People today want everything to be the same or at least similar. I kind of like it. The mature landscaping helps too.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Always felt comfortable in your company, John. Thank you for inviting me to share your love of a piece of unique Texas geography. Texas homes amaze me in their “democracy”. The architecture lacks the pretension found in many wealthy California homes. I was happy to read the term, “Live Oak.” I used “live oak” in one of my stories and was criticized by a reader who asked why anyone would call an oak tree “live.” An oak tree, they claimed, is either alive or dead and if it’s dead it hardly deserves mention. Still, I told them, in Texas, there is an oak called a “live oak”. And now I can add there is a Live Oak Golf Course. Very enjoyable, John. Is it near Austin? Or your other haunt?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Near Austin. A little Northwest on the south shore of Lake Travis. Yes, live oaks live in Texas.

      Like

  24. I loved this post, John. One of your best Views of the Neighborhood. What a fabulous neighborhood. Thank you for the tour!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for going along.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure, John.

        Liked by 1 person

  25. A good dose of history. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Rhonda

      Like

  26. Beautiful lake shot – we lived on a lake in SC, and I still miss it. Love the diversity of the architecture of the homes.

    Like

  27. Thanks for the fascinating tour and information, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My pleasure, Michelle. Thanks for going along.

      Liked by 1 person

%d bloggers like this: