Views of the Neighborhood – Canyonlands Trails

 

Views of the neighborhood

Yes, it is another walk on one of the trails here in Lakeway. The map gives you an idea of extensive the trails are. We are only going to take one today.

Notice the distinct desert feel to the geography. There are a couple of Peacock orchid plants and a few grasses in this bed.

There’s a signpost up ahead. Friends of the park have several projects around Lakeway.

Here is one view of the trail, which is not very colorful. The cedars are the predominant vegetation with limestone as the base component of the soil.

Another view showing some prickly pear cactus on the right.

Big power lines that run next to the trail.

The everpresent rescue marker so one knows where they are and can tell emergency responders their location.

More cactus. About the only thing green other than the cedars.

Rocky and steep trail.

Rocky and very steep trail.

The MUD water retention pond. (Municipal Utility District)

I just had to take a shot of a water tower that looms over the trail. All in all, the path was not like others. There is little variety,ย and it is very rustic and more desert-like. Maybe the next time we will go to an area that has a pond which was a little too far for a trip today. Besides, the cedar pollen is at an all-time high,ย and as an asthma sufferer, I need to get out of here stat.

57 comments

  1. Good and interesting pictures, John. Since you have asthma, it sounds like you sacrificed a bit to get them and show us. ๐Ÿ™‚ — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love that you have these trails so close to home. I swear Zeke and I would love exploring them daily!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Zeke would love this trail. Up and down and plenty of sniffing opportunities.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I don’t doubt it!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the water tower – I would never have guessed thatโ€™s what it was.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There is one in town that is painted to look like a golf ball on a tee. Thanks, Janet.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Looks like an interesting place to go occasionally, John, but I don’t know if I’d make it a regular route. How did the dogs get on with it?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They didn’t go with us. It was the first time so we decided to leave them at home.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Maybe next time?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Might be a little too rough for bulldog feet. Twiggy does not pay attention to topography and does come up with stone injuries if we are not careful. ๐Ÿ˜

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I used to have a greyhound like that. Mind you, Eos only needs to pick up the tiniest of twigs on any of her hairy legs and sheโ€™s immobilised until one of us picks it off. She then canโ€™t move until sheโ€™s had a reward for being a brave girl.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Hahahaha. We had a Silky Terrier who was that way.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Texas certainly has a variety of terrains. I wish the power lines weren’t there, but what ya goin’ to do, eh?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m afraid they are necessary. When you are on the trail you can’t see them. So at least there is that.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Looks nice and toasty. Thanks for risking life and limb for us!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hahahaha. The Producer no longer let’s me do these things alone. So risk is pretty low. Thanks, Jill.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Since we like long walks to new places I was especially impressed with the marker numbers along the trail so a person in trouble could let rescuers know where on the trip he was located. So is there a trick for always remembering to bring your fully charged cell phone?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The only trick I know is to believe your life may depend on it. ๐Ÿ˜

      Liked by 1 person

  8. The cedar pollen’s made it to the coast, now that the north winds are blowing again. I feel your pain — as do most people. I like the trail, even though it’s not “pretty” in a traditional sense. Limestone and cactus appeal to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. In its way it does have an appeal. I think my mood was dictated by the high pollen count. Thanks, Linda.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Looks peaceful. There a lot of trails in the area?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Quite a few. At least three major ones.

      Like

  10. The things you suffer for your art, John.

    Feels like it would be a great run/hike trail.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I would worry about turned ankles on a run. But yes good hiking. Thanks, Marc.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Run on the straightaways and hike on grades. No sweat, ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Looks like a gorgeous walk, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes it was. Thanks, John

      Like

  12. This was delightful to see on a cloudy, cold New England morning. The cactus and grasses and big pond are beauties. Thank you, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love cold cloudy New England mornings. Thanks, Jennie.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I do, too… until February hits and it feels like seven million of those days in a row. You must feel the same way in August about the days of heat in Texas. Best to you, John.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. So true. ๐Ÿ˜

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Looks like a wonderful trail to me John. I love its desert-like character.
    Have a great Sunday,
    Pit

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Pit. It is definately a desert.

      Like

  14. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

    You live in a beautiful area, John. And, it is heartening to see the pride people have in the environment. High pollen is a problem for me as well, and I tend to hibernate during those times. Thank you for sharing your wonderful life with us. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Gwen. Sorry about your pollen problems.

      Like

  15. Rugged and beautiful! โ™ฅโ™ฅ

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Billy Ray. Rugged for sure

      Like

  16. Yikes! I wouldn’t have thought about any sort of pollen being high. Run away, John!
    Thanks for a lovely wintertime stroll. Happy New Year.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The cedars now. Oak pollen later.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. It looks like a fun trail … maybe it’ll be greener in the spring?? I would definitely need my walking sticks … well, I always need my walking sticks ๐Ÿ˜‰ Thanks for sharing, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Marie. ๐Ÿ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Reminds me a bit of the juniper forests we get out west. Those are interlaced with pinyon pines, and that means pine nuts in the fall.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Love me some pine nuts

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I’m a bit green forest and river kind of gal, but I love the diversity of Nature . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  20. It is definitely a different kind of trail than we find here in Ohio, but I thought it looked like a lovely walk. As a fellow asthma sufferer, I totally understand. There are days when the air doesn’t permit a walk to the mailbox, much less out in nature. I’m glad you posted the water tower. I love comparing the different styles we have here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Michelle. Lucky for me the wind was down or it would have been impossible.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Another beautiful slice of Texas! Thanks for sharing, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jan

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I’d love to have such a variety of trails near us. Thanks for the tour, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are welcome, Teri. Thanks for going along with me. ๐Ÿ˜€

      Like

  23. I missed this, John. It’s nice to have these trails close by. I didn’t realize (never thought about) pollen at this time of year. Thanks for the pictures!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. You took these just recently? They look so hot and dry!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. These were taken on Saturday. Was about 60 degrees.

      Like

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