Views of the Neighborhood – Some Plants

I was supposed to do a feature, on an embroidery exhibit at the local library. I must have had the date wrong since there was nothing there. So here it is mear minutes from a deadline, and I got nothing. It was then I started looking around and noticed some interesting (to me) plants. So here we are. I hope you find them interesting. If not, well, Β let’s hope next week is better.

Views of the neighborhood

I thought these agaves were lovely. These are at the entrance of a section named The Hills in Lakeway.

Views of the neighborhood

A different kind of agave with a backdrop of grasses and live oaks

VViews of the neighborhood

This sign has a waterfall, some peacock orchids against a backdrop of live oaks and junipers.

Views of the Neighborhood

Here is a shot of some typical live oaks.

Views of the Neighborhood

On one corner are some beautiful artichoke agaves

Views of the Neighborhood

Here is a full shot of the bed including a potted artichoke agave.

VViews of the Neighborhood

Here is the opposite corner with the same kind of agave display.

Views of the Neighborhood

I thought this footbridge across the culvert was cute. This is a shot of Lakeway Boulevard looking North.

VViews of the neighborhood

Here is Lakeway Boulevard looking South. I thought this stand of grass combined with the stark deciduous trees was a good photo op.

Views of the Neighborhood

The tree in the grass is marked as are all the trees in Lakeway. In this way, records of trimming and health can be maintained.

Views of the Neighborhood

I thought this live oak had personality given the twists and turns of its branches.

Views of the Neighborhood

No pictures of plants in the neighborhood would be complete without a giant prickly pear cactus. So here it is.

I hope you weren’t bored out of your mind. Of course, if you were, you would not have gotten this far. So there is that for sure.

 

77 comments

  1. You authors are used to being under the gun of deadlines. Making this work was a snap! Besides, that’s one heck of a prickly pear!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is. Thank you, Frank.

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  2. Gwen M. Plano · ·

    It’s always fun to see your neighborhood, John. It fits the “sunny and warm” image I have of Texas. We’ve had freezing weather of recent, with a little snow, and the streets are quiet because everyone is huddled indoors. πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I remember the winters in Michigan. Could be days before venturing out. Hopefully, you are staying warm. πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Bored? No way, John. I enjoyed seeing the plants. The prickly pear is gorgeous! Happy Sunday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is huge too. Thanks, Jill.

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  4. Always wondered about those markers whenever I see them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yup. They allow the city to keep track.

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  5. I thought that was a beautiful jaunt through your neighbourhood!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Great sunny pictures.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Rabirius

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  7. It wasn’t boring at all, John. It was as I have always pictured Texas. Do you happen to know just how many agave plants there are – and what do the make tequila out of?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tequila’s made from the species of agave called bue agave or (appropriately enough) Agave tequiliana. An image search will pull up fields of it in Mexico.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thank you, Linda.

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      2. Thank, Linda!

        Liked by 2 people

    2. There are 270 species as of May 2019.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I know right? By the way you can buy a blue agave and start your own brand.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. I particularly liked the twisty live oak. I remember live oaks from when I lived in Florida for a brief time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I thought that twisty oak was interesting. Might be 100 year old too.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Definitely not bored, John. Seeing anything green today is a treat. It’s 60 degrees here, pouring rain and everything underneath is brown – I totally enjoyed this tour. I like the artichoke agaves, except I feel the need to know which thing was named after the other. My favorite today is the footbridge. Thanks for including that,

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not sure which came first. I suspect it was the artichoke.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Being a sucker for cacti, live oaks, and Ashe junipers, I was delighted to find plants instead of an embroidery exhibit. That artichoke agave’s a new one for me. It’s really attractive, and looks like it has the advantage of remaining somewhat smaller than the big ones that have to be planted away from places where humans would come in contact with those sharp points.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They seem to stay small for a while. I have seen some rther large ones though. The points don’t seem to be as sharp as other varieties.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. If I got a really small one, it probably would outlast me before it got too big to handle!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. So true. We have a small one (about 18 inches across). It will outlast me for sure.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I was very far from bored, John. You captured so many lovely colours and textures. That oak was something else, too!
    Things turn out a different type of wonderful when you are “stuck” πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Dale. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  12. What an exotic blend, dear John! Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good way to put it, Maria. Exotic.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Beautiful photos, John. I rather enjoyed this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thak you, Maggie. I’m so glad.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Beautifully landscaped areas.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Pit.

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  15. Love the ‘live oak’ but all are so beautiful! β™₯β™₯β™₯

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Billy Ray.

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  16. The agave plants look alien-like . . I dig that.

    And the footbridge just kinda happening there in the middle of the road, I love that. Footbridges are cool. You could do a tour of footbridges and I would be all about it.

    Deciduous. What a great word.

    And that is a GIANT cactus!

    Nice save, Boss. No . . check that. Nice win. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Marc. I love foot bridges too. This one had a real “Not really necessary ” vibe.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It is. Completely so, LOL! But I’m glad they erred on the side of aesthetics.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yup. It is cute for sure. That’s why I took a photo of it. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  17. I like it. Your area is so different from mine that it’s nice to see new things.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We are on the desert side of life.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. A nice substitute for embroidery and more natural beauty. Quick and creative thinking!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thak you, Jo. Have a great week.

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  19. I enjoyed your pictures of the plants, John. I love plants and flowers and share lots of pictures on Instagram.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Robbie. I’ll have to check them out. I’m such a poor Instagram user.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. There is only so much time in a day, John.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That is an understatement.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. Great photos, John. I love the Agave plants! Have you ever seen one bloom? As with all cacti, they are incredibly beautiful. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have seen them in bloom on the coast. I have never seen an artichoke agave in bloom.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. D.L. Finn, Author · ·

    I loved the plant pictures, John! Oaks have such a personality:)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They do. It seems they are all characters.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. D.L. Finn, Author · ·

        πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  22. I like embroidery, but I like plants, too, so you did well, my friend. Those live oaks make me homesick for Gulfport! It’s interesting that somebody has tagged these trees so they can maintain records on them — that requires a lot of organizational skills. And as people move in and out of the community, there’s some continuity to the landscaping. What a great idea!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes they are all tagged on city property. Thanks, Debbie.

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  23. Nice save, John! I enjoyed the tour!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, John

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  24. You have a lovely neighborhood with those succulents, John. The live oak was pretty spectacular.
    Can you get water from a agave (presuming you are dying of thirst)?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not water but agaves have sap. The right kind can be chewed and would help keep someone alive.

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  25. I love plants so this post is a treat πŸ™‚ And I really love that little footbridge. Thanks for sharing, John, and, as someone has already said, “nice save” πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Marie.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Nothing could be boring about this post, John. The plants in your town are amazing and so different from what we find here in Ohio.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Michelle

      Liked by 1 person

  27. This is far from boring, John. It makes me want to start getting ready for spring and hit the nursery for plants. Love that big artichoke thingy. Guess I have to wait, though. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, the call of the garden gets strong this time of year. Thanks Jennie.,

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh, yes! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  28. I just love that twisty oak tree – used to climb trees like that when I was younger.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It invites a climb for sure. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  29. These are interesting plants, John. The pictures are good, so this post was successful. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Suzanne. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  30. I love the warm-weather look from your pictures! Come on summer! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah. It was about 60 degrees. Thank you, Rhonda.

      Like

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