Views of the Neighborhood – Fading Flowers

Today we are taking a stroll around the neighborhood to look at the last of the blooms. The summer heat is upon us, and so most of the flowers have finished, and the neighborhood settles into coping with the heat. Hope you enjoy.

Views of the Neighborhood

A very large pink Crape Myrtle. It hasn’t started dropping its blooms, but it will soon.

A red Crape Myrtle blooming its heart out.

Two more reds.

A white oleander. Β We usually see there on the highway.

A succulent going to seed.

A couple more Crape Myrtles.

A substantial white Crape Myrtle.

Some yard ornaments posing as deer.

Another succulent which went to seed then broke and uprooted itself.

I’m keeping my eye on this fig tree. The figs are getting bigger.

Esperanza in full bloom.

85 comments

  1. They may be getting ready to fade but not quite yet! Those myrtles are huge!

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    1. I was so impressed by them I had to take the shots. Thanks, Dale.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Gorgeous!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Gwen M. Plano · ·

    A wonderful walk, John. We’ve had over 100-degree temps for several days, which is most unusual for our area. Whether in humans or in nature, temperatures are heating up these days.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. We are going to 106 today. Not a good thing. Thanks, Gwen.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice displays, John. I particularly like the deer posing as yard ornaments. πŸ˜€

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I liked them as well!

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Or yard ornament posing as deer. Thank you, Keith. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Beautiful blooms, John. The deer made quite a display. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

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    1. They were walking with me too. Thanks, Suzanne. 😁

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  5. That first crape myrle is magnificent!

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    1. It is quite a tree for sure. Thanks, Liz.

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      1. You’re welcome, John.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Thanks for the beautiful walk, John! The crape myrtles are gorgeous!

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    1. They are almost ready to drop te blooms. I had to get them this weekend or not at all. Thanks, Jill.

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  7. I can’t remember the last time I had a fresh fig! That pink myrtle is gorgeous, John. And I haven’t seen a residential oleander in many years. Once people discovered they were poisonous – they began disappearing.

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    1. I guess poisonous is the reason you don’t see many. That is the only one I have seen around here. Thanks, GP. I’m keeping my eye on those figs. (The deer are as well) 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  8. It’s all very pretty, John. We’re done seeing blooming things here, other than flowers. The rise of sharrons are getting ready to make their run. Maybe next month.

    Thanks for taking us along with you.

    Take care, and I hope you have a great week.

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    1. Thank you, Dan. I hope you have a great week as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Beautiful pink Crape Myrtle. I hope you brought plenty of water on your walk, John.

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    1. Thanks, Mark. Yes I had enough. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Interesting architecture in some of those. It’s cool that you can have fig trees in your area. I grew one for a couple of years, but they are borderline here. Eventually, one of our winters got it, even though I planted it close to the foundation.

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    1. Yeah. We only get freezing temps for a couple of nights so there guys really do well. Have a super Sunday, Craig.

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      1. You too, John.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. The succulent pictures are really cool. Didn’t know they did that.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Once they start that flower routine it is curtains. I think it is like a five year thing.

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      1. That’s kind of a shame.

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  12. I don’t think I’ve ever seen esperanza before — it’s gorgeous! Kind of hard to find cheery yellow flowers when the bulk seem to be red, pink, or white. And those crepe myrtles? Stunning! How I miss the ones I had when I lived in Texas — they must be huge by now, unless somebody chopped them down (gasp!)

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    1. Go to Google Earth and check them out. Just put in the address and you can see a sky or street view. Esperanza are native to Texas.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Beautiful blooms, John. Unlike many of our neighbors, I love the deer even though they eat the gardens. But they’re such a sight to behold. Thanks for the lovely walk. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We have no gardens here so we welcome the deer. Most of the vegitation is deer resistant.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I love Crape Myrtles. Ours will be going soon, too, I think.
    Have a wonderful Sunday, John,
    Pit

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Pit. You as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Great pictures, John. I think our succulents have also gone to seed, based on these pictures, and that is why they look so scraggly and tall.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Especially love that esperanza, John! I haven’t seen any of that around here, I don’t think. We had big winds last night, and on my walk this morning I saw a huge section of a blooming pink crape myrtle downed. Such a shame.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Pretty neighbourhood! I got the heat ‘perspective from one of yr comments. 106 huh? Pretty respectable for a generally cold place. Indian northern plains get to a peak of about 45, or a little over 110F I think. But this peak happens in May and June.

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    1. Yeah I know we have nothing on the Indian Northern plains. 106 seems pretty hot though. Thanks, Ankur.

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      1. I know sometime ‘we’ living in hot places tend to play down the hot weather in normally cold places like the US, but a 106F in the US is can be hot. In my experience, it is probably more difficult to be in the open in the US in 106F than in India in 116F. Not sure of the science behind it, perhaps UV radiation, perhaps presence of dust particles in the atmosphere in India during summer months, etc.

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      2. Sounds like the basis for a UN study that will cost North of a billion. Thanks, Ankur.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Incredible parade of wonderful & useful plants! You must be full of fairies. πŸ™‚ Thanks, dear John!

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    1. Maybe, Maria.

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  19. Nice photos as usual. It amazes me how those succulants spend their entire life preparing to die. But then comes forth new ones.

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    1. It is amazing. Of course we do the same thing. πŸ˜€

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      1. This is true

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  20. That huge Crape Myrtle is really something to see!

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    1. It is so pretty in the sunlight.

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  21. I envy your figs. Our crop didn’t do so well this year, because of so much rain. On the other hand, the tomatoes were out of this world, so there’s that. You may know that Galveston bills itself as the ‘oleander city.’ There are hundreds of the shrubs lining the streets and parkways there. There wasn’t the traditional Oleander Festival in May, for obvious reasons, but it looks like you have an Oleander Festival in your neighborhood.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. I like the white crape myrtle that looks like an umbrella. I think many of your readers would like to see the figs when they appear. I’ve never seen that before. Thank you for the lovely view of the neighborhood, although it seems early to be dropping blossoms.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I will stay on the figs. The deer really love them and I’ll have to stay ahead of them.

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      1. Thank you, John. Much appreciated.

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  23. Those are gorgeous Crape Myrtles! Thanks for the tour. We have quite a few around here too. When the blossoms fall, they completely over the sidewalk; it looks like you’re walking on a velvet carpet πŸ™‚ Random thought: I wonder if the fake deer attract the real deer?

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    1. Fake deer could attract real dear. The other question is could real deer attract fake deer?

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  24. OMG look at that sky!! I haven’t seen blue skies in forever… 😦

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    1. This is Texas after all. We have this sky most of the time. Thanks, Jessica.

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      1. You’d think it’d be like that in Australia too. Not so 😁

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      2. It is funny how the weather is different. All depends on the pressure varients ans where they sit. We did have a bout of Saharian dust but that is gone. 😊

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  25. I used to see a lot of oleander but other plants took place when replanting. We have a lot of Myrtle in place of some trees with roots ripping the sidewalks.

    I thought the deer are real. They look real. I think they are real.

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    1. They are real. It was my idea of a joke. Thanks, Miriam

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      1. Haha, you almost got me! Good joke, John.

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      2. Thanks, Miriam. 😁

        Liked by 1 person

      3. You’re welcome, John. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  26. I became a Crape Myrtle fan when we lived in SC. Here in KY, ours are beautiful one year, then barely bloom the next. Have no idea what we’re doing wrong. This isn’t looking like a stellar year for them.

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    1. May be in the trimming. I’ve noticed the beautiful ones get trimmed in the winter. Thanks, Teri.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Esperanza is not familiar to me, John, but it’s gorgeous. That first crepe myrtle is magnificent! Thanks for a truly lovely stroll. Hugs on the wing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is native to Texas and flowers like crazy all year. It cannot stand shade and loves the blazing sun and hot weather. It is a perennial.

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  28. Beautiful!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Rhonda. 😊

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  29. That was a beautiful walk. The succulent going to seed reminds me of the Century Plant.

    Do you like figs?

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    1. I do like figs. As a kid Fig Newtons were my favorite. 😁

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      1. When I was a girl we had a neighbor with a fig tree and they introduced me to eating figs right from the tree. I still like fig newtons. Pepperidge Farms cookies and Fig Newtons are the cookies I buy. πŸ˜€

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      2. I haven’t had a Fig Newton in years. I think I need to get some. 😁

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      3. I don’t recommend the lite ones. Go for the real ones! πŸ˜€

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      4. Thanks, Deborah.

        Liked by 1 person

  30. I like all these crape myrtles, John. I don’t know if we get this kind of tree in Pennsylvania. Most of our blooming trees are finished. Hope you are doing well!

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    1. There are some cold hardy crape myrtles now growing in South Central Pennsylvania. Still pretty rare though.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Definitely pretty!

        Liked by 1 person

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