Views of the Neighborhood – Limestone

You know how hard it is to find neighborhood subjects during a pandemic? Well, real hard. It is a good thing we have our party bus and plenty of bloody mary’s today, cause today we are going to go look at limestone. I know, I know. Not the most exciting thing for sure, but we all like each other, and I have booked Big and Rich to play for us.

Lakeway has an abundance of Gen Rose limestone, and some of it carries traces of fossilized plants and animals. Unfortunately, The Producer and I could not find any fossils. It is believed the limestone was formed in the Mesozoic Era. For those without a calendar, that was about 108 million years ago.

So hop on the bus, help yourself to a bloody mary, grab a breakfast sandwich, and let’s go.

Our first stop is to look at a house that has been finished in Cordoba Cream limestone.

Views of the Neighborhood

Here is the side of a Target store with two kinds of limestone. Cordoba Cream on the top and Walnut on the bottom

A closer look at the Target store.

A couple of big chunks of limestone.

Here is a small stratum of limestone.

Some bricks made of Cordoba Cream limestone.

 

 

Views of the Neighborhood

Here is a hillside of undisturbed limestone under the turf retained by limestone blocks

Another hill of limestone. You can see the stratum lines even though they are covered in dirt and vegetation.

A fence made of limestone blocks.

Another block of limestone.

A wall made of smaller bricks of limestone

An exposed stratum of limestone.

A huge stratum of exposed limestone.

Milled blocks of Limestone as a landscape feature.

Another feature.

A fountain made of limestone.

Finally, our tour ends with another home finished with Cordoba Cream limestone

79 comments

  1. Personally, I’m a fan of our limestone. The area of the hill country where I do my roaming is rich in fossils, too. In fact, I have a few in my living room: heart-shaped clams, snails, and such. There’s a little stream running through the property, and after every heavy rain there arrowheads, scrapers, and fossils are washed clean. I leave human artifacts undisturbed, and never dig out any fossils, but who could resist having a few as mementos?

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I would love to see those on the ground. Terrific. Thanks, Linda.

      Like

  2. Great tour, John, and thanks for the refreshments! We’re limestone capital up here too.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It is amazing how much limestone there is. I learned that Canada and the US in the central part was under water for centuries which caused the limestone to form. Thaks for the visit, Mark.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Using what nature has provided in many ways none of that in this area!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I totally lied. I decided to look up limestone in Quebec. We have brown or grey limestone that is extracted and used all over the place. And upon looking realised my grandmother’s original house was built with the stuff. You’ve taught me something new!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Okay we bothe ewere wrong. I made the supposition that your area was not under water. I guess it was.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I thought not. The things we learn…

        Liked by 1 person

    2. You are too far West. Your part of the country was not under water for eons. Ontario was however and you’ll find limestone there.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you for the tour, John. Like your area, our area has lots of limestone too. So beautiful. Have a great day!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Gwen. If we were here 100 million years ago we would have needed a boat. 😁 Have a great Sunday.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. So NH’s granite is Texas’s limestone! A very interesting neighborhood tour.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes. Ours formed by the sea, yours by volcanic action.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I didn’t know that, thanks!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Ask Mr. Wizard here. 😁

        Like

  6. Thanks for the interesting tour, John. I enjoyed it. I appreciate you and The Producer looking for fossils! Happy Sunday!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes we were totally unsuccessful at it though. We know the approximate location but could,t find them. Thanks, Jill

      Like

  7. It certainly comes in handy around your neighborhood.
    But the tour ended too soon, I was hoping for another margarita.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Here. I made this especially for you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Umm… good to the last drop (or grain of salt, which ever comes last.

        Like

  8. It’s beautiful stone. Interesting to see the Target store done that way. Is that the result of a zoning requirement? Where I used to work, a nearby Home Depot was over-the-top with brick but that was required by the town.

    Thanks, too, for my word of the day – stratum.

    I hope you’re having a good weekend, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It is a great word. Thanks, Dan.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Very cool shots. Don’t think we have a lot of limestone here.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Charles. I’m not sure what you guys have there. Maybe we call them big rocks.

      Like

      1. Looks like we’re a lot of basalt and quartz.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Granite too I suspect.

        Like

      3. Doesn’t look like it.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. I love that limestone fountain. And to be able to munch on a breakfast sammie and sip on a Bloody Mary whilst taking in the sights is bonus round.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes and don’t forget Big and Rich are rocken out with Save a Horse, Ride a Cowboy. https://youtu.be/S9ZbuIRPwFg

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I love your limestone tour. We had quite a bit in Nevada from back when Lake Lahontan covered most of the state. Up here in Idaho most of the state is granite and other volcanics.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. There was a big swath of water between both coasts way back when. Thanks, Craig

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for letting me ride along, John — I loved it! (And personally, I think you’re doing a great job finding things to feature during this pandemic!). I’ve always liked limestone; in fact, the fireplace in our house is made from limestone, and it provides a beautiful focal point for the room. Several homes in my neighborhood are built from limestone, too.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I like it too. We have some limestone patio stones. We also had a house ontime that had limestone floors. I loved those. Cool in summer, warm in winter.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I don’t think I’ve ever seen so much limestone, John. It must come from eons ago and the inland sea? How durable is it?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It is from an inland sea and it is durable enough to withstand the weather.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Okay… I’m a self-proclaimed rock geek, but I found this fascinating, John. Thanks for the tour. Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Teagan.

      Like

  15. Excuse me is this the bus where the Corona is served in limestone mugs… and the margarita’s are severed in quartz ?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. And bloody marys served in glasses. You are in the right spot, John

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Lakeway seems to have made good use of its limestone, John. I learned a lot more about limestone today. Congratulations on finding so many things to write about. Maybe I need some Bloody Mary’s. I’ve always been afraid of drinking too much because of alcoholism in the family but I’m tempted to hoist a few during this pandemic. Just kidding. Take care, John. πŸ˜€ — Suzanne

    Liked by 2 people

    1. If there was ever a reason to hoist a few this pandemic is it. Thanks for the chuckle, Suzanne. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I love limestone.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Me too. It is a very versatile stone.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Whoo hoo! I’m drinking a bloody mary and singing along to “Save a Horse, Ride a Cowboy!” πŸ™‚ I love all the ways Limestone is used in the hill country. Great tour!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I enjoyed this tour, John, very interesting and the limestone is beautiful. But I’ll pass on the Bloody Mary and have a mimosa instead. Thank you! πŸ˜‰πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Here you go. Sorry all I had was a quart mason jar. Maybe you can share with someone.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Great, and yeah, sharing would be a good idea. Otherwise, it won’t be a pretty sight. 🀣

        Like

  20. A very cool tour, John (and the drinks were a nice touch). Limestone is huge in my area, but I never stopped to really consider it before. I’m inspired!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Actually, boring old me loved the limestone tour. Hubby is from Pennsylvania, and he has driven me to many a limestone site. Who knew Texas had limestone, too? Well, probably everyone but me. The hill where you can make out the limestone lines was especially interesting and new to me. Thanks for the Bloody Mary’s. They made the trip even more fun.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Jennie. I did too. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I know I’m in the Texas Hill Country when I see lots of limestone. Nice photos, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. So true. Thank you for the visit, Joan.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. I’ve seen Texas limestone mentioned several times on my fav show on HGTV – always liked the look of it. Thanks for the Bloody Mary!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You’re welcome, Teri. Thanks for the visit.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. The limestone is very attractive, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I really like it.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Interesting tour! I love how so much limestone is used in the Hill Country in building new and old and seem to go with the natural landscape. Austin stone was a term I remember from way back to describe stone for a home. I think the name came from limestone quarried around Austin. Thanks for getting us out! Virtual tip for the tour guide!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I loved the virtual tip, Jo. Thank you. 😁

      Like

  26. That was a neat tour, John. I like the look of natural stone and it’s nice to see it incorporated into the buildings and landscape there.

    Thanks for the Bloody Mary, and breakfast sammie. See you on the next tour! πŸ˜€

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Okay then. Save your souvenir glass for the next time. (do wash it though) Thanks Deborah. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  27. What a practical solution, dear John! Limestone is everywhere, while the bus is always on its honourable place. πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. So true. Thank you, Maria.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      2. πŸŒΉπŸ‘ PS. Preparing my site & Twitter invasion. I hope it will be ready by night. 😎

        Liked by 1 person

      3. We can only hope. 😁 Send me your twitter address when you have it.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Dear, John, please, see the email. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      5. I got your address and have re-tweeted your posts. Follow me at @HowellWave

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I have already done, dear John! Thank you so much for your support & the idea! :-)πŸ‘πŸŒΉ

        Like

  28. PS: When I look at the bus, I remember two songs. They are “Yellow Submarine” & “Yellow river”. πŸ™‚ The power of associations!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Don’t forget Yellow Brick Road. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I don’t know this one. I should listen to. πŸ™‚

        Like

  29. Thanks for the tour, John. You have me returning to my 9th grade Earth Science knowledge. I’m going to look for some here πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope that was a good place for you,Barbara.

      Liked by 1 person

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