Top Ten Things Not to Do on Vietnam Veterans Day

Unsplash photo – Vietnam Memorial Wall – Photo by Caleb Fisher

 

Today is Vietnam Veterans Day. A day to remember those among us who answered the call to serve and to the over 58,300 Americans who were silenced forever.

The Top Ten things today are all the same. Do not forget those who gave of themselves despite the turmoil that surrounded this war.

These are individuals who deserve our respect and gratitude no matter what we personally believe regarding the conflict.

 

100 comments

  1. πŸ’™πŸ’™ always remembered πŸ’™πŸ’™

    Liked by 1 person

    1. 😊 🌷

      Like

  2. Great reminder, John. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thank you for the reminder of Vietnam Veterans Day.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It is something that tends to be forgotten. Thanks, Liz.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome, John. I remember my dad becoming chaplain of the VFW and the American Legion so that he could minister to the returning vets who were being treated so badly.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. A good cause for sure. Thanks, Liz.

        Like

  4. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

    Thank you, John, for the reminder. For our generation, the Wall and the Day have special meaning. Friends, family, and the masses who served – thank you. πŸ’—

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Gwen. I always think of my cousin who served three tours with the Marines. He was wounded twice and came home to a life filled with his own personal nightmares. He tried to chase them with hard living and died way too young.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I agree with all Top 10, John!!
    I’ll be especially going to the virtual Vietnam Wall to pay respects to Panel W46, Line 23.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I went there as well, GP. A prayer for all five.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Well said, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Steve.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Great message, John. I have several friends who served. I’m proud of them and all that served.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Me too, Dan. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Thanks for sharing this, John.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Interesting. Are there individual Veterans Days for all of the wars?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Not that I am aware but these veterans were so villified by hate groups at the time that in my mind there needs to be make up respect.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. No more needs be said.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Dale.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I love this SO much, John! Thank you for honoring these men and women!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Jan. 😁

      Like

  12. D.L. Finn, Author · · Reply

    Well said and a good reminder to never forget.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Denise.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Loving and warm thoughts to all who have served.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Monika.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I loved this and too didn’t realize there was an actual day to commemorate it. I’ll just bet that Wall, in Washington, is covered with notes and cards. Other than the Lincoln Memorial, it’s my favorite on the Mall. There’s a wonderful book called, A Riff in the Earth, about the building of it, how many people hated Maya Linn’s conception of it, only 21 when she won the commission. I’m always moved how the wall rises as the names of the fallen increase.

    The most poignant time is Christmas when they put up a tree. Anything left, is collected and archived, doesn’t matter what it is. It was such a bloody, senseless war so at least in their sad, missed absence, they’re treated with the respect they so deserve.

    Thanks for this.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The wall is now one of the things that bind us together. You can’t help but be moved as you stand in witness to the sacrifice of those who are so silent. Thank you for your comment, Susannah. Those who served were treated horribly and we as a nation we all need to correct that miscarrage.🌷

      Liked by 1 person

      1. In remembrance.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. All of Arlington Cemetery is a place of remembrance.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. It’s so incredible to visit. You can spend the day there in awe. JFK’s grave site, as moving as it is, is a mere preview of what’s there. Bobby’s simple white cross never fails to take my breath away, along with those Civil War tombstones that are darkened and frayed. sigh You’ve popped another file John.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. This one is packed with my stuff too. 😁

        Liked by 1 person

      5. But ya know, isn’t that great, that we have such reverence, that we don’t just phone it in? I know so many people who have never been to Arlington when it should be mandatory to go pay your respects. The fallen who fought so we could live our lives the way we do…a grace we take for granted while they fertilize the earth. sigh

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I used to give people my Grandfather’s grave location since one priveldge of knowing an internee is the ability to drive to the site. No one has even hinted they want to visit for I can’t tell you how long. You are right. It should be mandatory.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. I WANT TO VISIT GRAMPA. HOW GREAT!!! SEE, THAT TAKES THE LINE…IT’S WHO YA KNOW…AROUND THE BLOCK…TWICE. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      8. If you go I’ll give you the details.

        Liked by 1 person

      9. It’s a deal. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      10. 😊He’ll love having a beautiful thin girl stop by.

        Liked by 1 person

      11. I do believe in talking to the dead…or our ancestors as a girl I know puts it. I used to go converse with Alexander Hamilton in Trinity Graveyard way before he became a Broadway rock star. I’d leave change on his tomb, a combo of Hebrew custom and a salute to our first Secretary of the Treasury. See why I can’t get a date John? I roam cemeteries packed with crullers, talking to the dead. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      12. I don’t know but such an event sounds pretty good to me. 😁

        Liked by 1 person

      13. Figures. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      14. 😁 It does doesn’t it.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Well said, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Mark

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I absolutely love this. Thank you, John!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Luanne.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I always remember.
    I did costumes for a Showtime movie about Vietnam, The Wall. How could anyone forget?
    Whatever you think.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. There are many in this country who would like to forget and who treated our Vets with a total lack of respect. The government even turned its back on them. Thank you, for sharing this, Resa.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. My pleasure!

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Thank you for the reminder, John. Yes, thank you ever so.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. petespringerauthor · · Reply

    An excellent and important reminder. God bless all our vets!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. True, Pete. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thak you, Susannah.

        Liked by 2 people

  20. So perfectly said, Boss.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes, he’s the boss of know your history. So agree with that.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. His Monday essay never fails to educate and illuminate. Right?

        Liked by 2 people

      2. As the kids say, facts!

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Fats. Could use a donut.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Couldn’t we all.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Yes, indeed. Maybe even a apple fritter

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Oooo a cruller. πŸ˜‹

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Don’t laugh, but I woke up thinking about Mrs. Herbst’s Hungarian Bakery who’s known for her crullers. They ooze with butter that well, they should come with a heart surgeon. I do recall a time one never worried about fat grams. sigh

        Liked by 1 person

      8. That time will come again. I’m at an age that I could care less about fat grams. I thank big pharma every day. 🍩

        Liked by 1 person

      9. I envy you. I juggle them like tennis balls.

        Liked by 1 person

      10. In my younger days I did as well.

        Liked by 1 person

      11. You’re not Moses ya know.

        Liked by 1 person

      12. Moses speaking to the gathered masses, “I have good news and bad news. The good news, I talked him down to ten. The bad news, adultery is still one of them.”

        Liked by 1 person

      13. Hey you both know I’m standing right here. Right?

        Liked by 1 person

  21. What a turbulent time and how poorly our soldiers were treated when they returned home! Thank you, John – lest we forget…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was turbulent. The poor treatment came from a bunch of snotty kids who grew up to be snotty adults.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I agree…

        Liked by 1 person

  22. I had no idea that March 29 was National Vietnam Veterans Day. I feel a little better since finding out that it’s only been in effect since 2017, but, gee, I’m married to a Vietnam Vet so I should know these things! Thank you for enlightening me, John πŸ™‚ Thankfully my husband did not go to Vietnam, but he served and has been active in veterans’ advocacy groups. Thank you for this post, John xoxox

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The important thing is to support Vietnam era vets. They were treated very badly by the citizens and government.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. A lovely tribute, John. It is easy to have perfect hindsight.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes it is. In this case there is time to put that hindsight to work and thank these people. Thanks, Robbie.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. I saw the title, took a deep breath hoping this would not be a regular Top Ten, and then breathed a big sigh. What followed was my throat closing and my eyes watering. Thank you, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry to scare you, Jennie.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Not a scare, just my way of saying using your Top Ten made the important message even better in this post. Thank you!! πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you, Jennie. I was heartsick the way some of my family members were treated. My nephew was a Bronze star, Combat Infantry Badge recipient who did three tours. He was an officer with a four year commitment and then had to command a reserve unit upon completion of active duty. He had no choice. My cousin was wounded three times (once in the head) and returned to duty each time. He was a Marine and it took my uncle going to his congressman to get him out of country. This was the government. This doesn’t even talk about how the public treated them.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. It was a terrible time. Hubby was on the carrier headed to Vietnam when the war was cancelled. Upon his return, the treatment of anyone in a uniform was atrocious, so no one was allowed to wear a uniform in public. Sad.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. It was a disgrace for sure.

        Like

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