Friday JohnKu – AKA – TGIF – FriYay/Goodnews

Today’s good news story comes from the Good News Network. Here is in its entireity.

National Marine Sanctuaries

Australia’s Ocean Kelp Forest is Growing at Light Speed–Rivaling the Mighty Amazon for Absorbing CO2

 

Great forests of ocean kelp were found in a recent study to be between 4 and 11-times more productive than the most productive crops grown today like wheat, corn, and rice.

On land, the fastest growth rates occur in the tropics, but in the ocean, the most productive ecosystems are found in the temperate zones, where cool, nutrient-rich waters create forests of golden, bull, and bamboo kelp that can grow 100 feet tall (35 meters).

This was the result of a global diving survey organized by the University of Western Australia, during which they found the most productive sea forests outgrow even the mighty Amazon Rainforest.

These most productive forests came from South Australia and South Africa, where can be found the Great Southern Reef and the Great African Sea Forest, respectively.

The Great African Sea Forest is believed to be expanding in size, unlike many other mega undersea habitats. Made up of bamboo kelp and containing huge amounts of biodiversity, it stretches over 400 miles from Cape Town’s waters to Namibia’s, nourished by an Antarctic current known as the “Benguela upwelling.”

The Great Southern Reef in Australia is fringed by a golden kelp forest stretching 5,000 miles across the continent’s coast. Next to the golden kelp, bull kelp can grow at a rate of 14 centimeters per day.

“On land, we can use satellites to measure tree growth, but underwater things are much more complicated as most satellites cannot make measurements at the depths kelp forests are found,” Dr. Albert Pessarrodona from the university’s Oceans Institute and School of Biological Sciences, told the Sydney Morning Herald.

To get around this fact, divers around the world compiled productivity reports on kelp forests, which were then compared and analyzed for nutrient levels, sun penetration, and wave exposure.

The findings were that tropical forests were not the most productive and that those from the temperate zones contain kelps that can grow 11-times faster than wheat, corn, or rice.

This mass natural production aids in the world’s food security, the authors found, and nowhere is this more demonstrated than in Indonesia. The aquaculture of their seaweed forests creates products as varied as bioplastics alongside ice cream.

As well as assisting in human flourishing, these forests play a critical role in the global carbon cycle by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Much like their productivity is much higher than their terrestrial counterparts, the rate at which they absorb CO2 has been measured to be 30x faster than trees on the land.

Scientists from the non-profit Great Southern Reef estimate that if just 0.001% of the ocean’s surface was cultivated with these productive forests, it would offset the emissions of the entire global aquaculture industry.

The good news here is hope for the continued renewal of the Earth. Today’s JohnKu talks about carbon emissions. I hope you have a great weekend.

Air by John W. Howell © 2022

Air contains a lot:

Carbon, oxygen, and dirt . . .

Our goal: clean it up.

101 comments

  1. The more we know, the more we grow. It’s nice to see these proactive approaches going on around the world. Great story Boss.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Pilgrim. Never got to a JohnKu though.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. No need some days.:)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I went back and posted it.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Gotcha Boss 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Keep the good news coming, John. Always a lovely antidote to the week’s worth of misery that the media seems to bring…. 🙄

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I hear you, Lori. The media loves misery instead of truth. 😁

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You know what they say, John, “If it bleeds, it leads.”

        Liked by 1 person

  3. That’s good since the Amazon is in danger.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes it is. Thanks, Charles.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Oh how interesting is this bit of news. Kelp forests is something most of us don’t think about because we don’t see them on a regular basis. Good find!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I think someone somewhere is going to figure out how to make a business out of kelp and then we’ll hear a lot more. Thanks, Frank.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wonderful! This is an exciting and hopeful development. Thank you for sharing, John. 😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Gwen. I thought it was significant too.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Great news, John! Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Wonderful news

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Linda. It really is.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Great discoveries. I still want to protect the Amazon, though.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Let’s hope it is not too late.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. I saw the Australian kelp forest on a nature show and was amazed to hear these facts. It gives humans hope for the future.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Of course we all have to listen up. Thanks, GP.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Wow. That last paragraph is an incredible statistic. Thanks for sharing, John. Happy weekend.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Staci. Have a great weekend too.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. The earth is amazing, John. I wish we would do more to help.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Sadly the zero emissions actions by the White House are gong to make matters worse. Just look at California’s troubles with power outages.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. California is in a world of hurt. I think the goal is a good one, but I question the timing and the manner of going about it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. There is a liberal blogger who continually espouses the emission mantra now complaining about losing power several times a week. Yes he lives in California where many of the cars are electric and are unsupported by the infrastructure. Made my day

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Ditto what Dan said! Great story, John, and on-point JohnKu. Have a wonderful weekend 💕🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Harmony. I hope you have a wonderful weekend as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Interesting, John. I agree with Dan. Wish I could do more to help.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think we all do.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. GREAT news. Kelp forests are also important to sea otters.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes they are. I’ll bet you’ve seen photos of them sleeping with a kelp leaf covering them.

      Like

      1. I have – off of Monterey , California!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yup. That’s where I did too.

        Like

  15. Another wonderful reason to preserve the health of our oceans, John. Great news. I like seaweed in food, but not sure about kelp ice cream!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Maybe we all should try it. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  16. D.L. Finn, Author · · Reply

    Another great bit of news. The ocean offers us so much.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It does and I know how much you are connected with it.

      Like

  17. Very interesting, John. Loved the Johnku.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Michele. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  18. These Friday posts always brighten my day, John – thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad, Teri.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Good news indeed. In fact there are so many wonderful things happening right now on Earth that it’s time to watch the TV news less. Thank you, dear John🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think watching the TV less will make even more wonderful things happen on Earth. Thanks, Maria. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 🌎🌏 Let’s hope these days will come…soon,dear John.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yes let’s hope, Dear Maria.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. “hope for the continued renewal of the Earth.” I love that! Great JohnKu, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jan. 😁

      Like

  21. Yes! There is hope for our oceans and earth. TGIF to you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank yu Jo. I hoe so. TGIF to you as well.

      Like

  22. Bad news is: somebody will try and make money off it and somebody else will find a way to screw it up. But I am hopeful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Then someone will eat it all.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Actually it can be quite tasty.

        Liked by 1 person

  23. Wow! That’s amazing to me that kelp absorbs co2 from the atmosphere. Thanks for sharing this, John. I learned something. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Always good to learn.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It sure is! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  24. I enjoy your “GoodNews” posts, John!!! Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Rebecca.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Anything that aids in world food security is good news, indeed!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Safe at home! Nicely done, Boss.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Didn’t have to slide either.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Not when you bring the cool.

        Liked by 1 person

  27. petespringerauthor · · Reply

    The Earth’s ability to heal itself is extraordinary if we just give it a chance.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Pete. The chance is the issue. When the world was locked down over COVID things improved for the planet.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Exactly so. We all need a kelp forest. I’ll start one in our bath.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great idea. Invite a couple of otters over for lunch.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Great story, John. Thank you for sharing it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is. Thanks, Maria.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Wonderful news, John. And we need all the good we can get. Wonderful JohnKu, too 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Dale. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Happy Sunday, dear John!

        Liked by 1 person

  31. A wonderful, informative article! I’m thrilled we (man) hasn’t killed off everything.
    Your JohnKu made me chuckle. YES, we must clean it up!
    Here’s a few 🧽🧽🧽 to help you do your share.
    This is what I am doing: https://www.sheridancollege.ca/newsroom/articles/arts-design/sheridan-graduate-sews-to-save-environment – It’s an article on my Art Gowns from my Alma Mater Alumni magazine. They say I am sewing to save the environment! xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love that article and the gowns are beyond beautiful. Thank you for sharing it with me. XOXO

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 🤗 Hey, those are my big XOs. Oh, okay you can give them out too.XOXOXO

        Liked by 1 person

      2. WHEW!!!!
        XOXOXO 💋🐂

        Liked by 1 person

      3. 🍷🍷Cheers! ..hic..okay 1 more before dinner 🍷clink🍷 Where the hell did the ox go?
        🎼 Where have all the oxen gone
        🎶 Gone to emoji, every one
        🎶 When will we ever learn
        🎼 Soon I hope, I yearn

        hic! XOZxoxo -Hey how did that Z get in?

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I like your song. I was thinking of Zebra earlier. Maybe that’s how the Z got in there. 😁 XO🦓xoxoxo

        Liked by 1 person

      5. You thought a zebra in? You know if there is one, there is a herd! Of course I adore zebras. Okay you sneaky son of a gun, you win this one! 🙄 Sigh 🥰🥰🥰

        Like

  32. Refreshing to read about some good things going on on our planet John. Yay for kelp! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is refreshing. Yay for kelp for sure.

      Liked by 1 person

  33. Keeping my fingers crossed for this and other innovative strategies. I think the planet needs all the help it can get.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do too, Monika.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. […] Friday JohnKu – AKA – TGIF – FriYay/Goodnews […]

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for sharing my post.

      Like

  35. Wonderful, John.

    Liked by 1 person

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