Views of the Neighborhood – Lakeway Heritage

On Friday I indicated I was going on a Lakeway heritage tour. Well, I did it and discovered that I have already shared most of the stops with you. The bus tour did not allow getting off the bus but did start at the Liebelt Cabin. So I have devoted this blog to it.

Here is a map of the tour. There are 22 points of interest.

Here is the Liebelt Cabin built-in 1868  by August Liebelt. It was initially located on 80 acres in what has become a commercial tract. In 2011 it was moved to its present location near City Hall.

Here is a pictorial of the move.

The cabin was positioned on its current site in the same orientation as it was originally built.

The cabin had three doors One in front, one at the side and one in back. This allowed for ventilation in the summer.

August Liebelt sold the 80 acres and all his possessions except for a mare for 500 dollars. He then went to Grayson County, Texas and died in 1911 at the age of 79. This marker is a replica of his gravestone.

Gwen and Joe Wunneburger occupied the land and raised goats and other wool-bearing animals. This object was used to place the wool that had been sheared for transport to market.

The person on the left is Gwen Wunneburger who briefly lived in the cabin until their home was built.

The marker near the cabin

A horse-drawn seed planter used on the land

A horse-drawn hay cutter also used on the land.

Interior view – The bed

Chair and shelves. Don’t know how the fan got there. There is no electricity in the cabin.

Stove and more shelves

The fireplace.

I also found one more sculpture Titled Two Herons

I hope you enjoyed a look at the Liebelt cabin

 

52 comments

  1. Loved the log cabin. Looks pretty sturdy – truly built to last, eh?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It has done well since 1868 so I think so. Thanks, GP

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Gwen M. Plano · · Reply

    Great tour, John. I love seeing how folks lived. We could all learn from their ingenuity. Thank you for the morning inspiration!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This lady is quite a character. She says she’s cried a creek of tears since leaving her land. Here is an interview with her. https://youtu.be/TrxGHY2cGIw

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Gwen M. Plano · ·

        She is a character, precious!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. How very interesting, John. A lovely share.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Robbie. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  4. What a wonderful tour, John. The cabin looks quite cozy. Thanks for taking us along. Enjoy your Sunday.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for coming along, Jill.

      Like

  5. Love historical places. Nice photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thanks for the affordable trip through time, John.
    You’re the best.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Hook. Glad you enjoyed it.

      Like

  7. Thanks for the tour, John. It is a fascinating cabin – a great reminder that most of us live in luxury compared to “regular” folks more than a century ago.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, John 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Great tour. Cool that someone who lived in the cabin is still around.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Her family was on the land for 80 years

      Like

  9. Maybe they can get that couple from Waco to do a home makeover. Add a game room, a custom shower, maybe a new kitchen. (Amazing what we think we need today, compared to our ancestors.)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know right? Don’t forget shiplap.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. What’s your estimate of the interior size of the cabin? It looks a bit smaller than the hill country cabin I enjoyed for years, but my first thought when I saw it was, “I could live in that, happily.” The hill country cabin had no electicity or running water, so I’ve had a taste of that kind of life, and still think I’d enjoy it, especially if it came with a half-acre.

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    1. I would say it was no more than 20 by 20. Not sure I could do it.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Someone did an exceptional job on the fireplace. Hope it looked like the original. Can’t imagine what it was like to cook over an interior fire during a Texas summer.

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  12. I love glimpses in history! And I love that bits and pieces of it are preserved for future generations. Thanks for sharing, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for the lovely words, Jan

      Liked by 1 person

  13. D.L. Finn, Author · · Reply

    I always try to image living like that. Such a different life from now. Thanks for sharing, John

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, it is. One was so busy just living there was no time for psychological issues.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Very interesting tour! (I love historic places.) Thanks for taking us along.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for going with me, Liz.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Good pictures, John. We see these big cabins in movies but this is much more realistic. If there was a large family or visiting relatives there must have been people laying all over the floor at night. 🙂 — – Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is true. (or in the loft). Thanks, Suzanne.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I forgot about the loft. 🙂 — Suzanne

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Always amazing to see how folks used to live. Thanks for the tour, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for the visit, Teri. Especially after a busy weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Lovely tour, John! This is one of the original “tiny house” models, isn’t it? Modern-day folk think they’ve come up with a novel idea, but our ancestors lived tiny long, long ago!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is so true, Jim. I had not thought of that before. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Lovely visit, John.
    And like Jim said, the tiny house way of living was the only way for most folks. Maybe that’ll help me gain perspective on this joint…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There you go. Tiny house for sure.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. What an undertaking! It always fascinates me how they are able to move these old structures.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know. I can’t imagine doing it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Great work though. They did a splendid job of it.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. John, I talked you yesterday on the tour, and you mentioned your Blog. I decided tonight to find it.
    Thanks so much for your comments + your readers! I’m so happy your readers appreciate Gwendolyn and her cabin reminiscenses. Please follow us on Facebook and city website and Save the date for unrelated event, October 22, 7 p.m. Lakeway Activity Center when ‘Beak’ Howell, former Director of NASA, will speak. Vickie Taylor, Chair, City of Lakeway Heritage Committee.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for stopping by, Vicki. I have the date. Come back​ anytime. I feature Lakeway every Sunday.

      Like

  21. I love the log cabin! There is a log cabin that is owned by the town’s museum nearby (I used to live in the town). I’ll try to get some photos.
    This was such an interesting post, John. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Michelle.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I love looking into heritage buildings, John. It’s so interesting to get a glimpse of how people lived. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is, Dan. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Great tour! That cabin sure has a lot of character. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  24. […] John Howell shares views of his neighborhood each Sunday. Click to see this week’s edition. […]

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