Friday JohnKu – AKA – TGIF – Fri-Yay/Good News

 

Photo courtesy of NOAA

Today’s story comes from the Good News Network. Here it is without editing.

World’s Largest Container Line is Rerouting its Fleet to Avoid Collisions with Endangered Blue Whales

Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) has taken a major step to help protect blue whales and other cetaceans living and feeding in the waters off the coast of Sri Lanka by altering shipping lanes to avoid their habitat.

A global leader in container shipping and logistics, MSC began in mid-2022 to voluntarily reroute its vessels passing by Sri Lanka on a new course that is approximately 15 nautical miles to the south, in line with the advice of scientists and other key actors in the maritime sector.

The decision was based on research surveys completed by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), with the World Trade Institute (WTI), Biosphere Foundation, University of Ruhuna (Sri Lanka), and supported by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

Westbound ship traffic is now limited to a latitude between 05 30N and 05 35N, and eastbound traffic is limited to a latitude between 05 24N and 05 29N in order to avoid designated cetacean habitats.

– Released.

Sri Lanka lies in the Indian Ocean, between Asia and Europe, and the port of Colombo is a major transshipment hub for global trade.

The area off its southern coast is one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world and is also inhabited by large populations of whales, meaning that these animals may be at risk of colliding with ships.

Simulations have shown that moving the official shipping lane 15 nautical miles to the south could reduce the strike risk to blue whales by a whopping 95%. However, despite years of advocacy by scientists, the shipping industry, and NGOs, the boundaries of the official shipping line have not been reassigned to reduce the risk of ship strikes on cetaceans.

MSC is now taking measures to protect marine wildlife seriously, from adapting shipping service networks to keep away from designated whale breeding and feeding grounds to reducing vessel speed and rerouting ships to avoid reported marine wildlife populations.

“We believe that the commercial shipping sector has an important role to play in protecting cetaceans, specifically in helping to reduce the risk of ship collisions with whales,” said Stefania Lallai, Vice President – Sustainability at MSC.

“MSC is proud to rank at or near the top of whale safety shipping rankings. However, we are not at all complacent. We believe that raising awareness of these issues and encouraging collaboration between industry, scientific bodies, civil society, and governments is essential as we strive collectively to do more to minimize the risk of ship strikes.”

In Sri Lanka specifically, the liner shipping industry led by the World Shipping Council, of which MSC is a member, has advocated creating a new official marine traffic scheme that is fully separated from the blue whale feeding area.

It is hoped that this will soon become a reality, so all large-scale commercial marine traffic moves to the more southerly zone that MSC ships are now guided to follow. In the meantime, MSC urges all other ship operators to consider choosing a more southerly route past Sri Lanka to significantly reduce the possibility of whale strikes.

The good news here is that big business is beginning to take some stewardship of the planet. Today’s JohnKu talks about sharing the planet. I hope you have a terrific weekend.

Neighbors by John W. Howell Β© 2022

We often take care,

Of our neighbors when in need . . .

Why not animals?

Today I’m at Story Empire talking about lousy story endings. Here’s the LINK if you want to visit

98 comments

  1. Hear Hear! to MSC for doing the right thing, proactively.

    It’s the kind of compassion we need more of from companies that can but simply won’t. Here’s an example they can try on for size.

    Great going Boss.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, pilgrim. These guys can be an example of doing the right thing.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Amen to that.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Michael.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Great news, and a fantastic idea. They have the older right using the routes. Thanks for the information, John! Have a beautiful weekend! xx Michael

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Have a beeautiful weekend as well, Michael. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Rah rah 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  3. That’s great news, John! Glad some corporations are starting to take notice.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Me too, Joan. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Good news, for sure, John. We need to share this planet.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thant is for sure, Dan. Thanks. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Great news! Thanks for sharing, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Jill. 😊

      Like

  6. Outstanding news!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Great news. Amazing that it’s only 15 miles considering the size of the ocean.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You have to wonder how many more 15 mile opportunities are out there and if other shipper will use that lane too.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Just 15 miles yet a world of difference for these magnificent creatures’ safety. Love this John!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Lori. I thoght it was wonderful too. 😊

      Like

  9. That’s great.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Instead of my happy dance, I’m doing a happy whale 🐳 song 🎢! Great story, John. Thanks for sharing. Love your JohnKu. Have a wonderful weekend πŸ’•πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Harmony. Have a wonderful weekend as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Three cheers for MSC!! Hopefully other companies will follow their lead.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes let’s hope so.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Love the story. And the John-Ku. Happy weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Staci. Happy weekend to you

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Inspiring and hopeful news! What a great read to start the day. I would hate to think of our world without animals. We should extend them great care.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We should, Maggie. I have to wonder why humans don’t sometimes.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I wonder, too, John.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. An inspiring story John. However I feel there is a lot more to it and some of it will be very slow to come. Having recently been broadsided by a deer at full speed it makes me wonder what happens when a 175 ton whale and a large cruise or container ship collide at speed. The laws of physics and mass are undeniable. Some how I doubt either side fares very well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes I think hitting a whale with the sharp prow of a ship might not be good for the whale. Steel is less giving than flesh. Sorry about the deer. I’ll bet that was a pretty big repair bill.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The deer was spooked by something. It came running over a small hill running full speed and broadsided the rear driver’s side door. The impact physically moved the car sideways. I did not loose control of the car. It was a strange experience. I was doing 50ish on a state route and the deer was at full speed too. All I saw was a blur out of the corner of my eye. As for the ships most of them have the bulb nose with a sharp edge above the waterline. I know the steel is gonna win. However how much it wins might be more of a surprise than either of us expects. I think it is more than altruism that is causing them to change their route. Though they might not readily admit it. Running into 750 tons of blue whale at speed is still running in to 750 tons.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’m not sure but I don’t think I would like to un into a deer or a whale and would do everything to avoid both. Maybe the company felt that would save a lot of money by not running into whales. (Makes sense to me)

        Like

  15. Good on them, and hopefully that company will be an inspiration to others.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. And I hope they get more business which would be the capper. Thanks, Noelle.

      Like

  16. I hope the other shipping services will quickly adopt this as standard operating procedure. Good story, John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do too, Bruce. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. That’s great! MSC is a privately owned company and can make moves that shave a bit off profits without major stockholders raising hell. Maybe this will push other corporations to make some positive moves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope so, Tim. I also hope folks give them more business as a result of their actions.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. This is fantastic. And here I thought MSC was only cruise lines. Good for them for stepping, or rather, sailing, forward with this initiative. Hopefully, other companies will follow suit. 15 nautical miles is not much considering how much it can help protect marine life. Well done, sir!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank yoiu, Dale. I hope others follow the lead.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It would be grand!

        Liked by 1 person

  19. Kindness abounds! When caring takes precedence over money, it is encouraging that the world is not totally lost! Thanks for sharing, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It gives us hope of better things. Thanks, Jan

      Like

  20. If only this would become the norm…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Pamela. This would be a great norm. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  21. D.L. Finn, Author · · Reply

    Nice to hear they are taking the lead that can save some whales πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Denise. Thank you.

      Like

  22. I love that photo, John, and what wonderful news. I really do think it’s possible to live and conduct commerce while respecting nature and its creatures. Science can help us make accommodations, even small ones, that have a huge impact. Cheers to MSC for taking that step. Thanks for the smile and the Johnku.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for sharing your gthoughts, Diana

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Wonderful story, John. Thank you for sharing, and for offering a wonderful haiku.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Gwen. I agree it is a good one.

      Like

  24. Yay, to MSC! Hopefully, more industry giants will follow in their footsteps.
    Hooray for the whales and for another wonderful JohnKu Fri-Yay!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Mae. I liked this story since it clearly shows what can be done if people care and take time to figure things out. Have a super weekend

      Like

  25. I love hearing this. Hopefully some other big corporations will take notice. It’s not all about money.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Teri. I hope others follow.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Glad to see people taking moral responsibility. Nice JohnKu.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think so too, Michele. Thanks

      Liked by 1 person

  27. What a great story — thank you, John. And your Haiku is perfect, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Debbie. Have a great weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Good on MSC for showing that businesses don’t have to be part of the problem, they can actually be part of the solution. Thanks for sharing, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I like that aspect too, Marie. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. petespringerauthor · · Reply

    Seems like a win/win. Ships running into whales or vice versa can’t be good for either.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. Thanks, Pete. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  30. News like this is always welcome-thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is good news. Thanks, Monika.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Good news for sure!

    Liked by 1 person

  32. It’s a fab story, and we need more. I love animals, and do my little bit by being a veggie…. and signing petitions.
    As for those who haven’t thought about the animals, your JohnKu can fill in the blank for them.
    🎁 Is this an okay box for an ox? πŸ‚
    OHOH… πŸ’‹πŸ’‹ the ox is gaining!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Perfect box for an ox. Looks like the πŸ’‹πŸ’‹ are gaining. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

      1. πŸ’‹πŸ’‹πŸ’‹πŸ’‹

        Liked by 1 person

      2. πŸ‚πŸ‚πŸ‚πŸ‚

        Liked by 1 person

      3. AHA!
        I see your πŸ‚πŸ‚πŸ‚πŸ‚, and raise you 6 πŸ’‹.
        Ooooo! i hope I win again!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I see the six πŸ’‹ and raise you 5πŸ‚

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Now what do I do? See your 5 πŸ‚ and raise 10 πŸ’‹’s?
        Where does bluffing come in?

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Yes. Do you have enough πŸ’‹ to raise 10?

        Liked by 1 person

      7. No, I was lying!

        Liked by 1 person

      8. I thought so. Oh well since you are drinking wine I’m going to give it to you. 🍷

        Liked by 1 person

      9. Yay!!! Pays to be a wino! xoxoxoxo

        Liked by 1 person

  33. Oh, that is happy news. Somewhat surprising, too. I doubt many companies are willing to put whales over profits.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Let’s hope they change. Thanks, Betsy.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. At last! Wonderful news, dear John. Everybody must realize that all of us are the part of the same…Let’s hope they will do something good indeed. You know these big companies of today…πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜‘

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes we are all one world. Thanks, Maria πŸ€—

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 🌍🌀🌝

        Liked by 1 person

  35. That is good news John. Good to see big corps getting responsible for our planet. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Debby. I wish more would get involved.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We can hope and keep educating. πŸ™‚

        Like

  36. Your JohnKu is spot on, perfect for helping save blue whales. Wonderful that big corporations are caring and doing something.

    Like

    1. I think so too, Jennie.

      Liked by 1 person

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