Friday JohnKu – AKA – TGIF

The week has been a quick one for sure. We continue to have hot and humid days here on the Texas Coast. Of course, people always ask, “So what did you expect?” I think to some degree they are right. Having lived in San Antonio during the summer, one cannot expect snow in August.

When the heat gets really bad, I tend to think back to the times when there was no air conditioning. I always wonder how folks could bear to sleep in temperatures above eighty degrees.  I did it for two nights when the electricity was out during Hurricane Harvey, and I can double dog guarantee doing it for a longer time wouldn’t make it any easier.

I think our technology allows us to exist in areas where we probably should avoid. Also, that is the beauty of technology. Allowing expansion into areas that would otherwise be inhabitable. Today’s JohnKu talks about human destiny.  I hope you have a super weekend.

Destiny by John W. Howell © 2018

From the earliest,

Humans have sought to expand . . .

Where is the boundary?

63 comments

  1. Nice JohnKu! Happy Friday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jill. To you as well.

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  2. I know what you mean, I’ve often thought about the first people down here in FL. Jungle and brush and swamps and heat, heat, heat!!!

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    1. Bugs, bugs, bugs as well. Thanks, GP

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      1. and then…….more bugs!!

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      2. On top of more. 😀

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  3. I wonder about how people made it without A.C. too. Maybe buildings were made to retain less heat or they used shade a lot more. Basements are a nice place to hide in the heat too.

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    1. I think the basement idea is a good one. I know in the country people had “summer kitchens” which were out away from the house. 🙂

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      1. Never heard of that. Smart idea. Now we do take out, but that gets pricey.

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  4. I have air conditioning but I use the ceiling fans on high during the hot months instead because of the cost. Most older people probably do that here. They also leave doors and windows open but I don’t like the bugs. We have screens in this flat. I do leave doors open when the electricity goes off. Have a good weekend, John. 🙂 — Suzanne

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    1. Thank you for sharing, Suzanne. Happy Weekend.

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  5. I grew up in a high humidity area without AC. I agree—more time doing it doesn’t make it easier. But you do what you have to, right?

    The last line of your haiku got me thinking… where are our boundaries? With technology, do we even have any? (I feel the first hints of a story forming.)

    Try to stay cool, John. And happy weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You go on the story.

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      1. Sure. I’ll add that to my ridiculously-long to-be-written list. 😀

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      2. TBW. I like that.

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  6. My sister-in-law is from Mobile. I don’t know what it is about her accent but when she says Mobile, it always sounds like a question.

    Anyway, I asked her how anyone could stand the heat without A/C. Her response was classic. “Oh,” she said, “in the summer without A/C, people get meeeaaaan.”

    And there was just something about the way she pronounced “mean” that made me never want to experience it.

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    1. Yeah I’ve heard that way as well. Thanks, Greg.

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  7. D.L Finn, Author · ·

    You make a good point of technology and living in places that were difficult before. I’m not a fan of heat it’s much easier to warm up in winter over cooling down in summer! Great JohnKu…have a great weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you , Denise. I agree on the warm up vs cool down.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I’m the opposite in that it’s easier for me to get cool than get warm, plus I hate having to bundle up to go outside in the winter. More than glad I moved back to SE Texas, despite the humidity and mosquitoes.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. The mosquitoes. UGH.

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  8. Oh, it’s hot and humid in Texas too John. Over here has been unusually hot and on occasion humid.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have heard the Brits complain. Aw.

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  9. I remember those air conditioning-less days after hurricanes, John — definitely NOT fun! I suppose being “spoiled” is rather nice (I know Dallas thinks so, ha!) Have a wonderful weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The dogs love it for sure.

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  10. Excellent haiku!

    Where is the boundary indeed? Do we have one? And what makes it so? So many questions derived from a precious few lines. Well done good sir!

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    1. I mean to give questions. Unfortunately I have few answers

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      1. You should have been a politician!

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      2. LOL. I think I could say a lot and do nothing like the rest of them.

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      3. It’s a plum job. You’ll have gobs of free time, you can blow off meetings and when you screw up, all you have to do is blame the other guy.

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  11. Maybe I’m wimpy, but I couldn’t survive without air conditioning. Have a great weekend, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not wimpy. Smart.

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  12. John, I grew up in South Texas (Freer) and we didn’t have AC until I was about twelve. We had fans during the day and opened the windows at night. I do not want to go back to that time! After Hurricane Harvey we spent several nights without AC and opening the windows did not help much. Houses today, especially in town, are not built to catch the breezes. TGIF to you and have a good weekend. It should be a good beach weekend with not much wind and plenty of sun. Almost done reading “Contact.” Another good thriller! Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Glad you like The Contract. The water is very calm around here. You are right. No wind.

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  13. There’s much history to support the JohnKu! Enjoy your weekend, and stay cool!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Frank.

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  14. I’ve been watching your heat on the map. I remember days of being at the beach when I was a teen and there was no A/C in the place where we stayed. It never seemed to bother me then, but looking back on it I have no idea how I managed.

    We’ve had several days of flooding in my area. Things are only now just starting to get back to normal with bridges being opened. My house is fine, but floods kept me from getting to work and basically shut down Hershey for two days…not good in summer for a tourist town!

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    1. I can relate. Keep your feet up. Thanks, Mae.

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  15. A profound thought. I think the only boundaries are the ones we create…

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    1. Thank you, Jan. I think you are right.

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  16. Where is the boundary indeed? I was having a Star Trek moment there, John. TGIF hugs! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6R3MiAv9ac

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Teagan. Hugs

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  17. I grew up without A/C in Iowa until I was about twelve, and I don’t remember it being a problem. Of course, the ratio of grass and trees to concrete was different, and houses were built differently, with wide galleries, windows and doors situated to create cross-drafts, and so on.

    The night I landed in Monrovia, Liberia, it was 109F on the tarmac at 1 a.m. When I got to the hostel where I was staying, I got my first bit of advice from a Liberian: “You gonna hate this heat. You think about it, it kill you. Don’t think about it.” It actually helped!

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    1. Good idea, Linda. I won’t think about it. LOL

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  18. I grew up without air conditioning, just open windows and doors, and later, box fans.I didn’t live in a place with air conditioning until I was 19. I have had to do without a/c for days from time to time over the years and it wasn’t fun. However, I think as I’ve gotten older I find it harder to deal with the loss of such ameniries. Yet another reason to hate hurricanes. Although I would rather be without a/c than heat during power of storm outages.

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    1. I can understand that for sure. Here it is better to be without heat than air. Thanks, Barb.

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  19. We adapt to our environment, over time. My neighbors are refugees from Iraq, and they were telling me the other day that in Iraq, the temperatures are quite often over 100, yet they have no electricity much of the time, no refrigeration, and often no running water. I’m like you … I am thoroughly spoiled by my air-conditioning, hot water on demand, electric light at the touch of a switch. But so many in this world don’t have any of that. Colour me thankful!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We are very fortunate, Jill. In most of the underdeveloped countries it is a matter of government inattention to the needs of the people. The poorer the population the less influence on infrastructure decesions. You can bet the head of state never goes without.

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  20. Well done, John. No AC here, but the nights in summer are typically in the 60’s, even when the days reach 90.

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      1. Yup. Except the reverse comes to play in winter.

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  21. Something to think about, John. Happy Saturday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not too hard though.

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  22. When I was a young girl we lived in the desert with no A/C. It never bothered me, now I’m in a milder climate and when it gets over 80 degrees in the house in the late afternoons in Summer the A/C comes on.
    Given the choice I’d rather live where it gets hot though. Once cold it takes too long for me to warm up, and my hands and fingers suffer terribly.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m with you Deborah. Wen we lived in Marin county and then in the town of Sonoma we never ran the air. We opened the house at night and then closed it up in the day. It was heaven. We always needed a feather comforter.

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  23. This one slipped by while I was baking on the roof. Interesting to consider, John. For lot’s of reasons.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yup. Deeper than it looks.

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  24. Reblogged this on Where Genres Collide and commented:
    I sometimes wonder if there is a boundary. We continue to push–even into space.

    Liked by 1 person

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