Friday JohnKu – AKA – TGIF – Fri-Yay/Goodnews

 

Plastic pollution in Indonesian ports. Image by Anton Wisuda/Mongabay Indonesia

Today’s story comes from the Good News Network. Here it is in its entirety (with typos outside of quotes corrected)

Fishermen Getting Paid to Collect Plastic Trash at Sea, As Indonesia Slashes Pollution

In Indonesia, small-time fishermen are being paid as part-time ocean cleanup crews as the archipelago seeks to tidy their seas and raise awareness among stakeholders at the same time.

The Ministry of Fisheries announced on October 4th that they had stashed around $70,000, or 1 billion rupiahs, to pay fishermen for any plastic trash they recovered from the oceans.

Many countries around the world are setting environmental or climate goals for themselves. One of the largest contributors of ocean-going plastic waste, Indonesia is looking to shake off that reputation by spending $1 billion over the next 3 years to reduce plastic entering the oceans from their shores by 70%.

If an Indonesian fisherman working off the main islands can collect 4 kilograms of trash per day, the government will pay out around $10 for it, which is slightly more than they would get if they spent their day catching fish to sell at market prices.

“This activity is very simple,” Sakti Wahyu Trenggono, the fisheries minister, said at a press conference in Jakarta. “But at least this will raise awareness among the stakeholders at sea and the people around the world.”

“The most important thing is prevention,” Sakti said. “If we can properly conduct prevention, then there shouldn’t be any waste in the sea. Because once the trash gets to the sea, then it’s already damaged.”

Indonesia is located in one of the fastest-developing regions on the planet, economically speaking, and the use of plastic waste has outpaced the installation of recycling infrastructure, especially on the smaller islands.

According to the UK’s Pew Trust, 95% of all fishing activities are small-scale. Small fisheries can’t absorb costs from things like ocean pollution or additional taxes like large-scale fisheries can, making this bottom-up approach to ocean cleanup uniquely suited to Indonesia.

Furthermore, Indonesia is surrounded by some of the most biodiverse shallow seas on earth, a Mecca for divers and snorkelers who aren’t interested in wading through plastic while they do it.

The good news here is a major plastic pollution contributor is taking steps to reverse the behavior. Today’s JohnKu talks about stepping up to the plate. I hope you have a fabulous weekend.

Amends by John W. Howell © 2022

It takes a big heart,

To admit bad behavior . . .

And then correct it.

90 comments

  1. Let’s hope all other countries follow suit, John 😃

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We can only hope, Chris. Thanks. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I hate seeing waste like that, land or sea. Nice to see someone doing something about it. Thanks for the Fri-Yay post, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Especially a big offender. Thanks, Staci.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Great project! A win-win for all.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I think so too. Thanks, Joan.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Very cool. Though I wonder what they do with it afterwards. How do you permanently get rid of plastic?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Would be a good follow up story. Thanks, Charles.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. This is a wonderful thing. Thanks for sharing John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you , Jill. I agree. 😊

      Liked by 2 people

  6. What a heartening story! Thank you for sharing, John, and for offering a great haiku. 😊

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Aww you are kind to say so, Gwen. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I especially like how at the end you say, ‘Admit bad behavior and the correct it.’

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Too few are willing to do that, GP. Unfortunately. Thanks. 😊

      Liked by 2 people

  8. I hate that we got to this point, but I’m glad to see someone trying to remedy the problem.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Plastic in the oceans is a terrible problem. The stuff never goes away.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I tried to work some of that into the scenery in Grinders, but it wasn’t the main story.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Good for the Indonesian government! Love today’s JohnKu as well.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Liz.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome, John.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. It sounds like a start. Hopefully there is a long term plan to reuse and recycle this material and keep it from ending up in the ocean.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hopefully. Thanks, John

      Like

  11. Good news indeed! I love it. Good for Indonesia for making the investment. Thanks for the smile, John.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Always a good thing to smile about. Thanks, Diana.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I love your JohnKu today. Words of wisdom for each of us to remember and live by.

    So glad Indonesia has recognized their situation and is taking steps to correct it. Happy Friday, John!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am glad they are stepping up, Mae. I hope they become an example. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Great story, John. I read an article this week where scientists think they’ve found Bacteria that can eat plastic. The waste product is an edible protein that they say humans can eat. Not sure I like the thought of eating it, though, lols. But a great way to eliminate all that plastic. Thanks for sharing. Have a wonderful weekend 💕🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That sounds amazing, Harmony. I can see it now. “Here’s your bacteria protein , Sir. Will there be anything else?” “No I think this will do.” 🤢

      Liked by 1 person

  14. It is indeed! I hope they clean up their beaches and sea and continue to do so.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do too, Deborah. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Thanks for sharing, John. This is a step in the right direction. One step at a time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Tim. Thank you

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Thanks for sharing, John. It is nice to see someone trying to stem the ever-rising tide of trash. More and more corporations are also working towards making their products bio-degradable where possible. Those are steps in the right direction also.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Bruce. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  17. What a phenomenal step! I hope the idea takes hold elsewhere. In the meantime, if anyone wants to contribute to a company that is collecting plastic in many places around the world, check out 4 Ocean, which has organized volunteer cleanup events in a number of countries. The company has a “One Pound Promise”, which promises that, at a minimum, one pound of ocean waste is removed per item sold. Not a bad idea since there was a recent report that microscopic bits of plastic are now found in people’s blood.
    See: http://www.4ocean.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for sharing, Noelle.

      Like

  18. “Plastic Fantastic Lover”, love your JohnKu!

    There is so much plastic to clean up, it’s almost defeating. Prevention is of utmost importance.
    So, we know this, and so we recycle. Yet, where I live black plastic is NOT recyclable. Still, many restaurants use black plastic containers with clear lids. There are other products using black plastic. I boycott any restaurant or product using black plastic.
    Why would they still do that, when it’s such a simple change to make? Anyway, instead of 🐂en & 💋es, I submit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1Hvp1Z10TIx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I could go for that. Maybe we switch to vinyl though.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hmm, vinyl… like the old records?
        I’m going to look and see what makes vinyl.
        Double use is a good idea.
        You order take-out. It comes in a vinyl container. When you are finished, simply wash it, slice where instructed (using blunt nose paper scissors) and throw it on your turntable!
        Your song will be a random surprise.
        oxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxox

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Well the song is about a plastic lover and I thought maybe vinyl might be more modern . I do like your record idea though. oxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxox

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Seems vinyl is as naughty as plastic.

        “Vinyl is not a natural substance but is a synthetic man-made material. It is a type of plastic that is made from ethylene (found in crude oil) and chlorine (found in regular salt). When processed, both the substances are combined to form Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) resin, or as is commonly referred to – Vinyl.”

        We need another something to be more modern.
        Still, you could be my “Vinyl Primal Lover”.
        All we need now is for someone to write the song! Shouldn’t be long now.
        Waiting…………………………
        💋🐂💋🐂💋🐂💋🐂

        Like

      4. 💋🐂💋🐂💋🐂💋🐂

        Here is a start
        My vinyl primal lover
        you sit looking at me.
        There is no primal other,
        You’re the only one I see.
        I wish you could say more,
        than those ten little words.
        I bought you at the store,
        black Friday with the hoards.
        The deal was a final sale,
        And no mention of returns.
        So never mind my sad tale,
        A heart for you still yearns.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Aww, This is so lovely!
        My primal, vinyl lover!
        Well why not?
        I can be as primal as any vinyl!
        X Rated Comment!!!!!
        ❌ -suited for adults only.
        ♨️ whew!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

      6. H ha ha. Love it. 🐂💋

        Liked by 1 person

      7. 🐂💋

        Liked by 1 person

  19. D.L. Finn, Author · · Reply

    Good to hear they are cleaning up after themselves!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I love that idea. A good beginning solution to a serious environmental problem.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes it is. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  21. […] collect dolls, and I’m sure they have their reasons but am grateful that no one I know has them. John Howell – you can read the rest of this post here: […]

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the mention, Robbie

      Like

  22. How eay and smart

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Your words say it all! It is sad that we must pay people to clean up their mess but these are people that are making a living from cleaning up everybody else’s mess. Kudos to them.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Good luck to Indonesian fishermen! Good guys! Let’s us follow their example. Thank you, dear John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes let’s hope they are very successful.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. I’m still continuing my mission to reduce single-use plastic in whatever way I can (courtesy of the Green Stars Project that put me more on that path!)…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good for you, Willow. Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Anything we can do to get plastics out of the oceans is a step in the right direction. Wonderful to hear this.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Teri.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Proactivity, thy name is love. I’m glad more companies are owning their missteps and then taking matters into their own hands. Great story Sheriff.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Pilgrim.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Good for them! Thanks, John, for passing along this good news (and for a really nice Haiku!!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Debbie. 😁

      Like

  29. petespringerauthor · · Reply

    I appreciate their efforts, but it’s also rather sad that we have to resort to measures like this just to do the right thing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. At least the Indonesians are making an effort. They really need to be doing something.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Fabulous! I’d love to see more of these efforts everywhere! Thanks, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Me too. Especially in third world countries.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. There are so many ways to beat this.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. It is wonderful to see a country take itself to task in this way. Kudos to them! And thank you for sharing this wonderful bit of news.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Dale.

      Liked by 1 person

  33. Wonderful!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Great news and such a wonderful story, John. Love your words, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Lauren

      Like

  35. My gosh, that photo is horrifying. I can’t imagine being so accustomed to seeing that much trash in the water. Great way for fishermen to earn more income. That’s wonderful news!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Betsy.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Great program and sad that only by getting paid will anyone do anything about cleaning up the polluted waters. But it’s a start. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes it is. Thank you, Debby. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  37. Years ago, my friends and I were on camping trip to Sumbawa. I was amazed of the harbor condition on the very west of the island. Almost clean!

    And months ago, I was in Labuan Bajo and smiled while looking to the harbor, because it was also almost clean from plastic waste.

    While in the end of 2015, the old harbor was a mess.

    Like

    1. So, good to hear. Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

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